Invoice, H. Smith & Co. to Jared Carter, November 1836

  • Source Note
  • Historical Introduction

Document Transcript

Nov. 1836
Mr. & Co
Bo[ugh]t. of
1. p[iece]s. Venetian Carpiting 90½ at 8/— 91.50
1. [ps Venetian Carpeting] 77 @ $1.00 84.70
1. [ps] Red Flannel 46 y[ar]ds @ 0.22½ 10.35
1. [ps] White [Flannel] 43 [yds] @ 4/— 21.50
5. lbs cotton Yarn 0.34 1.70
2. ps Plaid Gingham 60 60 [yds] @ 2/— 15.00
1. [ps] Pongee $8.00 8.00
1. Red Thibet Hkf [Handkerchief] 2.25 2.25
1. [Red Thibet Hkf] 0.80 0.80
2. Book Aprons 8/— 2.00
1. p[ai]r Super Buck[skin] Gloves 0.96 1.92
1. [pr Super Buck] Mittens 0.83 0.83
1 ps Bombazin 10 [yds] @ 14/— 17.50
2. Water Ruggs $5.00 10.00
1. [ps] Red Merino 24⅛ [yds] @ 1.75 42.22
1 2 [ps] Sheeting 61½ @ 0.14 8.61
1 [ps] Eagle [Merino] 32¾ @ 0.21 6.86
1 [ps] White Cambric 12 @ 4/ 6.00
1 [ps] Plaid Casimer 2¾ @ $2.25 6.18
1 [ps] Cotton Cloth 31 @ 0.13½ 4.19
1 [ps Cotton] Drilling 31 @ 0.14½ 4.59
2 [ps] Russia Diaper @ 18/— 4.50
1. [ps] Red Callico 30 @ 0.17 5.10
2 [ps] Callico 61½ @ 0.11½ 7.07
1 [ps] Furniture prints 27¼ @ 0.14 3.82
1 [ps] Super Chints 28 @ 0.27 7.56
1 [ps] Broad Cloth 4 @ $5.00 20.00
1 [ps] White Silk Gloves @ 5/— 0.63
1/4 lb Twist $12.00 3.00
12. Boxes Hooks & Eyes 0.02 0.24
2. Doz Spool Thread 4/ 6 1.13
3. Ribbon Aprons $1.33 3.99
3 [Ribbon Aprons] 9/ 4 3.51
Carried over $407.25
[p. [1]]
Bro[ugh]t. over $407.25
5. p[ai]r. Elastic @ 1/ 6 0.94
1/2 lb. Sewing Silk Super @ $11.50 5.75
1. Pack Pins @ 9/— 1.13
2. Doz[en] Tapes @ 3/— 0.75
3. Waist Buckles 6/— 2.25
1. Bunch Super Bra[i]d 7/— 0.88
1. [Bunch Super Braid] 3/— 0.37
6. [Bunch Super Braid] 0.16 0.96
4. Doz Frogs 0.22 0.88
8. Bunches Small brade [braid] 5 3/ 10 0.45
1. P[iece]s Piping Cord 0.14 0.14
1. [Ps] Ribbon 8/— 1.00
2. [Ps Ribbon] 3.00 6.00
3. Belts 3/— 1.13
3 Sheets Bonnet boards 0.06 0.18
1. ps. Canvass 6 @ 0.19 1.14
1. Fur Cap Super $17.00 17.00
1. [Fur Cap] 9.00 9.00
1. ps. “Blk” Br[oa]d. Cloth 3¼ $10.00 32.50
2. Bels Comforters 0.42 0.84
2. Polyglot Bibles 7/— 1.75
1. [Bible] 5/— 0.63
1. Red Shawl $5.75 5.75
1. [Red Shawl] Super 7.25 7.25
1. 3½ feet Looking Glass 9.00 9.00
2. 2 [feet Looking Glass] 6.00 12.00
2. 3 [feet Looking Glass] 7.00 14.00
1. Toilet [Looking Glass] <​Draws​> $3.00 3.00
1. [Toilet Looking Glass] 2.75 2.75
22 18 lbs Batting 0.14 3.92
1 1/2 [lb] Wicking 0.26 0.13
7⅔ Black Cambric 2/ 6 2.38
1. Box $1.50 1.50
1. ps Shirting 5½ 0.11 0.60
1. [ps] Green Frieze 16 2/— 4.00
$559.20
2 Boys Caps 5/— 1.25
2 Umbrellas $2.00 4.00
$564.45
[p. [2]]

Footnotes

  1. 1

    A clothing and curtain fabric with Chinese origins woven from uneven threads of silk. It was originally a tan color but in the early nineteenth century was often dyed. (“Pongee,” in Montgomery, Textiles in America, 327.)  

    Montgomery, Florence M. Textiles in America: 1650–1870. New York: W. W. Norton & Company, 1984.

  2. 2

    A type of felted, woolen fabric. (“Thibet,” in Harmuth, Dictionary of Textiles, 154.)  

    Harmuth, Louis. Dictionary of Textiles. New York: Fairchild Publishing Company, 1915.

  3. 3

    In the context of textiles, the term “book” is “derived from the booklike form in which some of the finer calicoes were folded and marketed in India.” A bookfold involved the fabric being “folded once lengthwise and twice crosswise.” (“Muslin,” in Montgomery, Textiles in America, 304; “Bookfold,” in Harmuth, Dictionary of Textiles 23.)  

    Montgomery, Florence M. Textiles in America: 1650–1870. New York: W. W. Norton & Company, 1984.

    Harmuth, Louis. Dictionary of Textiles. New York: Fairchild Publishing Company, 1915.

  4. 4

    Cloth made of silk warp and worsted weft in a serge or twill weave. Black bombazine was used for mourning garments. (“Bombazine,” in Montgomery, Textiles in America, 172, 175.)  

    Montgomery, Florence M. Textiles in America: 1650–1870. New York: W. W. Norton & Company, 1984.

  5. 5

    Cloth made from the wool of Merino sheep. (“Merino,” in Montgomery, Textiles in America, 294.)  

    Montgomery, Florence M. Textiles in America: 1650–1870. New York: W. W. Norton & Company, 1984.

  6. 6

    A light, plain woven cotton fabric. (“Sheeting,” in Harmuth, Dictionary of Textiles, 141.)  

    Harmuth, Louis. Dictionary of Textiles. New York: Fairchild Publishing Company, 1915.

  7. 7

    A light, plain woven fabric typically made from cotton or linen. (“Cambric,” in Harmuth, Dictionary of Textiles, 31.)  

    Harmuth, Louis. Dictionary of Textiles. New York: Fairchild Publishing Company, 1915.

  8. 8

    A strong linen or cotton fabric often used for trousers or military uniforms. (“Drill,” in Montgomery, Textiles in America, 225; “Drill,” in Harmuth, Dictionary of Textiles, 57.)  

    Montgomery, Florence M. Textiles in America: 1650–1870. New York: W. W. Norton & Company, 1984.

    Harmuth, Louis. Dictionary of Textiles. New York: Fairchild Publishing Company, 1915.

  9. 9

    The common terminology for coarse damask table cloth manufactured in Russia. Its threads were flattened between iron cylinders, giving it fine appearance. This type of damask was most commonly used in the homes of the middle class. (Gilroy, Art of Weaving, 424.)  

    Gilroy, Clinton G. The Art of Weaving, by Hand and by Power, with an Introductory Account of Its Rise and Progress in Ancient and Modern Times. For the Use of Manufacturers and Others. New York: George D. Baldwin, 1845.

  10. 10

    Another term for cotton yarn. (“Twist,” in Harmuth, Dictionary of Textiles, 159.)  

    Harmuth, Louis. Dictionary of Textiles. New York: Fairchild Publishing Company, 1915.

  11. 11

    Fasteners consisting of hooks and catches. (“Eye,” in American Dictionary [1828].)  

    An American Dictionary of the English Language: Intended to Exhibit, I. the Origin, Affinities and Primary Signification of English Words, as far as They Have Been Ascertained. . . . Edited by Noah Webster. New York: S. Converse, 1828.

  12. 12

    Braids were woven or plaited fabric that was flat, round, or tubular; they were used for binding or trimming. (“Braid,” in Harmuth, Dictionary of Textiles, 24.)  

    Harmuth, Louis. Dictionary of Textiles. New York: Fairchild Publishing Company, 1915.

  13. 13

    An ornamental fastening which consisted of “a spindle-shaped button, covered with silk or other material, which passes through a loop on the opposite side of the garment.” These closures were originally used on military dress coats and cloaks. (“Frog,” in Oxford English Dictionary, 4:559.)  

    The Oxford English Dictionary. Edited by James A. H. Murray, Henry Bradley, W. A. Craigie, and C. T. Onions. 12 vols. 1933. Reprint, Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1970.

  14. 14

    A light, plain woven fabric typically made from cotton or linen. (“Cambric,” in Harmuth, Dictionary of Textiles, 31.)  

    Harmuth, Louis. Dictionary of Textiles. New York: Fairchild Publishing Company, 1915.

  15. 15

    A type of coarse, napped, woolen cloth. (“Frieze,” in Harmuth, Dictionary of Textiles, 68.)  

    Harmuth, Louis. Dictionary of Textiles. New York: Fairchild Publishing Company, 1915.