Invoice, H. Smith & Co. to Reynolds Cahoon, November 1836

  • Source Note
  • Historical Introduction

Document Transcript

, Nov 1836
Mr
Bo[ugh]t. of
3. Water Ruggs $5.00 15.00
1. Fur Caps Super 17.00 17.00
6. 5. [Fur Caps] 6.00 30.00
1. [Fur Caps] 1.31 1.31
2 p[ai]rs. Super Buck[skin] Gloves at 0.96 1.92
5. [prs.] Fur Gloves $1.31 6.55
1. doz[en] Spool Thread 4/6 0.56
3 4. Papers Pins 19 0.37
6. Boxes Hook & Eyes 0.02 0.12
4. prs. Buck Mittens 6/10 3.44
1. [prs. Buck] Gloves 5/— 0.63
3 [prs.] Castor Super [Gloves] 4/— 1.50
1. Doz[en] Velvet Belts $4.00 4.00
2. Fur Collars 2.00 4.00
2. Y[ar]ds fancy Vesting 1.75 3.50
3. ps. Irish Diaper 18/— 6.75
4. Ivory Combs 0.08 0.32
1 ps. Filtcting 7. Yds [at] 0.19 1.33
1/2 lb Sewing Silk $11.00 5.50
1. Doz. Belt Ribbons 3.00 3.00
12 prs Elastic 1/6 2.25
2. Bunches Brade [Braid] 7/— 1.75
8 Small [Brade] 0.04 0.32
1 p[iece]s Grade [Gro de] nap Silk 26 [Yds] [at] $3.05 0.82½ 21.45
1 [ps] Pongee Super 8.00 8.00
1 [ps] Ribbon 1.00 1.00
1 [ps Ribbon] 1.25 1.25
1 2 [ps Ribbon] 0.60 1.20
1 [ps] Pink [Ribbon] Sattin 14/— 1.75
1 [ps] Carpeting 42¼ [at] $1.00 42.25
1. Shaving Glass 2. draws $3.00 3.00
1. 2 Ladies Rubber Apron $1.33 2.66
Carried over $193.68
[p. [1]]
Bro[ugh]t over $193.68
2. Misses Rubber Aprons 9/ 4 2.34
1. Umbrella $2.25 2.25
1. ps [piece] Plaid Casimer 3 y[ar]ds 2.25 2.25
1. Ball Twist 3.00 3.00
2. Iron Shovels 6/— 1.50
16. Doz[en] Quils 0.16 1.00
1/2 Gros[s] Gilt Buttons 24/— 3.00
1. ps Broad Cloth 2 yds $3.25 6.50
1. [ps] Casimer 8 [yds] 3.00 24.00
2. [ps] Sheeting 62. [yds] 0.14 8.68
1. [ps] Drilling 39¼ [yds] 0.16 6.28
1. [ps] Merino 14½ [yds] 9/ 6 17.24
1. [ps] Cambric 29 [yds] 0.11 3.19
1. [ps] Linen Lawn 6½ [yds] 0.48 3.12
1. [ps Linen Lawn] 6½ [yds] 0.52 3.38
1. [ps] Gingham 24½ [yds] 0.24 5.88
4. ps Sheeting 124 [yds] 1/ 6 23.25
1. [ps] flannel 28 [yds] $9.00 9.00
1. [ps] Broad Cloth 2 [yds] 8.50 17.00
$336.54
Dr To error in carrying out 4.50
$341.04
[16 lines blank] [p. [2]]
[page [3] blank] [p. [3]]
<​341.04​>
Bill of Goods [p. [4]]

Footnotes

  1. 1

    A “heavy, stout, fulled and calendered broadcloth overcoating.” (“Castor,” in Harmuth, Dictionary of Textiles, 35.)  

    Harmuth, Louis. Dictionary of Textiles. New York: Fairchild Publishing Company, 1915.

  2. 2

    A generic term for fabric intended to manufacture waistcoats. (“Vesting,” in Montgomery, Textiles in America, 372.)  

    Montgomery, Florence M. Textiles in America: 1650–1870. New York: W. W. Norton & Company, 1984.

  3. 3

    A linen or cotton twill woven fabric with a diamond pattern. (“Diaper,” in Montgomery, Textiles in America, 218.)  

    Montgomery, Florence M. Textiles in America: 1650–1870. New York: W. W. Norton & Company, 1984.

  4. 4

    Braids were woven or plaited fabric that was flat, round, or tubular; they were used for binding or trimming. (“Braid,” in Harmuth, Dictionary of Textiles, 24.)  

    Harmuth, Louis. Dictionary of Textiles. New York: Fairchild Publishing Company, 1915.

  5. 5

    TEXT: Possibly short for “Gros de Naples,” a plain woven silk fabric from Italy used for coats or hats. (“Gros de Naples,” in Harmuth, Dictionary of Textiles 74.)  

    Harmuth, Louis. Dictionary of Textiles. New York: Fairchild Publishing Company, 1915.

  6. 6

    A clothing and curtain fabric with Chinese origins woven from uneven threads of silk. It was originally a tan color but in the early nineteenth century was often dyed. (“Pongee,” in Montgomery, Textiles in America, 327.)  

    Montgomery, Florence M. Textiles in America: 1650–1870. New York: W. W. Norton & Company, 1984.

  7. 7

    A garment used by women during menstruation. (Vostral, Under Wraps, 64; “A New Article,” New-York Spectator, 1 Oct. 1835, [3]; Burton’s Comic Songster, 37.)  

    Vostral, Sharra L. Under Wraps: A History of Menstrual Hygiene Technology. Lanham, MD: Lexington Books, 2008.

    New-York Spectator. New York City. 1804–1867.

    Burton, W. E., ed. Burton’s Comic Songster: Being Entirely a New Collection of Original and Popular Songs, as Sung by Mr. Burton, Mr. Tyrone Power, Mr. John Reeve, Mr. Hadaway, &c. &c. Philadelphia: James Kay Jr. and Brother, 1837.

  8. 8

    A garment used by women during menstruation. (Vostral, Under Wraps, 64; “A New Article,” New-York Spectator, 1 Oct. 1835, [3]; Burton’s Comic Songster, 37.)  

    Vostral, Sharra L. Under Wraps: A History of Menstrual Hygiene Technology. Lanham, MD: Lexington Books, 2008.

    New-York Spectator. New York City. 1804–1867.

    Burton, W. E., ed. Burton’s Comic Songster: Being Entirely a New Collection of Original and Popular Songs, as Sung by Mr. Burton, Mr. Tyrone Power, Mr. John Reeve, Mr. Hadaway, &c. &c. Philadelphia: James Kay Jr. and Brother, 1837.

  9. 9

    A plain woven or twilled woolen or worsted fabric with a soft finish; used for men’s clothing. (“Cassimere,” in Harmuth, Dictionary of Textiles, 35.)  

    Harmuth, Louis. Dictionary of Textiles. New York: Fairchild Publishing Company, 1915.

  10. 10

    Another term for cotton yarn. (“Twist,” in Harmuth, Dictionary of Textiles, 159.)  

    Harmuth, Louis. Dictionary of Textiles. New York: Fairchild Publishing Company, 1915.

  11. 11

    Twelve dozen or 144 items. (“Gross,” in American Dictionary [1828].)  

    An American Dictionary of the English Language: Intended to Exhibit, I. the Origin, Affinities and Primary Signification of English Words, as far as They Have Been Ascertained. . . . Edited by Noah Webster. New York: S. Converse, 1828.

  12. 12

    A light, plain woven cotton fabric. (“Sheeting,” in Harmuth, Dictionary of Textiles, 141.)  

    Harmuth, Louis. Dictionary of Textiles. New York: Fairchild Publishing Company, 1915.

  13. 13

    A strong linen or cotton fabric often used for trousers or military uniforms. (“Drill,” in Montgomery, Textiles in America, 225; “Drill,” in Harmuth, Dictionary of Textiles, 57.)  

    Montgomery, Florence M. Textiles in America: 1650–1870. New York: W. W. Norton & Company, 1984.

    Harmuth, Louis. Dictionary of Textiles. New York: Fairchild Publishing Company, 1915.

  14. 14

    Cloth made from the wool of Merino sheep. (“Merino,” in Montgomery, Textiles in America, 294.)  

    Montgomery, Florence M. Textiles in America: 1650–1870. New York: W. W. Norton & Company, 1984.

  15. 15

    A light, plain woven fabric typically made from cotton or linen. (“Cambric,” in Harmuth, Dictionary of Textiles, 31.)  

    Harmuth, Louis. Dictionary of Textiles. New York: Fairchild Publishing Company, 1915.