Invoice, Keeler, McNeil & Co. to Rigdon, Smith & Cowdery, 11 October 1836

  • Source Note
  • Historical Introduction

Document Transcript

No. 1
, October 11 1836
Messr ,
Bought of KEELER, McNEIL & Co.
WHOLESALE DEALERS IN FANCY AND STAPLE DRY GOODS,
14 BROAD STREET,
NEXT DOOR TO THE EXCHANGE HOTEL.
5 p[iece]s 3/4 Blea[che]d Shirting 165 11½ 18.97
3 [ps] 7/ 8 [Blead Shirting] 87¼ 14 12.22
8 [ps] 9/ 8 C. Eagle [Shirting] 253½ 21 53.23
2 [ps] Apron Check 100 15½ 15.50
2 [ps] Super [Check] 87½ 1/6 16.41
1 [ps] Pink [Check] 40½ 16 6.40
1 [ps] Red Flannel 46 32½ 14.95
1 [ps Red Flannel] 23½ 50 11.75
1 [ps] Super [Flannel] 23½ 55 12.93
2 [ps] Yellow [Flannel] 62 45 27.90
1 [ps] White [Flannel] 43 50 22.50 21.50
1 [ps White Flannel] 23 50 11.50
1 [ps] 4/ 4 [White Flannel] 23 95 21.85
2 [ps] Canton [Flannel] 75¾ 1/ 6 14.20
1 [ps] Green Fizer [Frieze?] 56 25 14.00
1 1 [ps] Canvass padding 41¾ 21 8.76
3 1 [ps Canvass padding] 44¾ 19 8.51
1 [ps] 6/ 4 Red [padding] 30 8/ 30.00
1704 1 [ps] 4/ 4 Irish Linen 11 65 7.15
41 1 [ps Irish Linen] 25 80 20.00
39 1 [ps Irish Linen] 26 55 14.30
981 1 [ps] super [Linen] 25 9/ 28.13
1156 1 [ps] Birds Eye diaper 21 27½ 5.78
1160 1 [ps Birds Eye diaper] 20 40 8.00
3 [ps] Bro drill[ing] 92¾ 14½ 13.44
6 Corded skirts 65 3.90
1 [ps] Mohair Coating 16 3.50 56.00
7039 1 [ps] Mix Cloth 19½ 3.00 58.50
2761 1 [ps] Cadet [Cloth] 17¾ 3.25 57.68
44874 1 [ps] Super Stat [Cloth] 11 5.75 63.20 63.25
6268 1 [ps Super] Blue [Cloth] 27 5.25 141.75
43384 1 [ps Super Blue Cloth] 13 6.75 87.75
over 886.21
[p. [1]]
Amo[un]t bro[ugh]t over 886.21
5379 1 p[iece]s Black Cloth 28½ 5.50 156.75
48390 1 [ps Black Cloth] 7.25 52.50
7086 1 [ps] Extra [Cloth] (2 y[ar]ds dlerd) 11 10.00 110.00
407 1 [ps] Green [Cloth] 25½ 3.50 89.25
5684 1 [ps Green Cloth] 12½ 5.00 62.50
14511 1 [ps] Mulberry [Cloth] 6 6.50 39.00
<​Short 10 yd.​> 1 [ps] Bro Satint 39¾ 80 25.40
1 [ps] Slate [Satinet] 27 11/ 37.13
1 [ps] drab [Satinet] 19 1.50 28.50
1 [ps] Blue [Satinet] 31 11/ 42.62
1 [ps Blue] Plaid [Satinet] 24½ 8/ 24.50
1167 1 [ps] Lavender plaid [Satinet] 18¼ 16/ 36.50
3930 1 [ps] drab [plaid Satinet] 19¼ 2.25 43.31
1 [ps] Mixd Cloth 15 2.25 33.75
<​Sh[o]rt​> 100 4 [ps] 3/4 Merinos 10.00 40.00
1 [ps] 6/ 4 Purple [Cloth] 28½ 80 22.80
8 1 [ps] Light Bro [Cloth] 28 95 26.60
4 1 [ps] Super Black [Cloth] 28 9/ 6 29.75
3 [ps] Pink Furniture prints 84½ 14 11.83
3 [ps] Chintz [Furniture prints] 96¾ 17 16.44
2 [ps] Super London [prints] 56 27 15.12
1 doz[en] Heavy Cotton Bra[i]ds 2.00
5 1 [doz] Cotton Not [Braids] 0.63
18 1 [doz Cotton Not Braids] 1.00
170 1 [doz] Wht Cotton Hose 4.00
184 1 [doz Wht Cotton Hose] 5.25
4 p[ai]r 2 Blue Prints 118¼ 14½ 17.14
1 [p[ai]r] Blk White [Prints] 32 20 6.40
6 [pr] domestic [Prints] 191½ 10½ 20.11
3 [pr] Ruby [Prints] 94 20 18.80
2 [pr] Super dark Chintz [Prints] 56 25 14.00
2 [pr Super dark Chintz Prints] 56 28 <​1919.79​> 15.68
2 [pr Super dark Chintz Prints] 56 30 16.80
8 [pr] Plaid Ginghams 240 25 60.00
2 [pr] Goats Hair Camblet 76¾ 85 65.23
887 1 [pr] Bro Holland 26½ 21 5.26 5.56
889 1 [pr Bro Holland] 26 25 6.50 <​2098.56​>
[p. [2]]
Am[oun]t bro[ugh]t up 2,089.56
753 2 p[ai]r Black Holland 52 31 16.12
754 2 [pr Black Holland] 26 32 8.32
1 [pr Black] silk Velvet 4.25 41.44
1 [pr] Super Bro Po de soie [Peau de Soie] 41⅞ 85 35.55
1 [pr] Black Gro de swiss 40 95 38.00
1 [pr] Fig[ure]d silk <​◊◊◊​> 13½ 16⅞ 10/ 21.97
1 [pr Figd] Merino <​◊◊◊​> 9¼ 11½ 8/ 6 12.22
1 [pr] Buckram 25 2.38
1 [pr] Fansy silk Vesting 10/ 9.37
2 [pr Fansy silk Vesting] 6 1.75 10.50
1 [pr] Toilient [Vesting] 75 6.56
2 1 doz[en] Woollen Comforters 3.25
5 1 [doz Woollen Comforters] 4.25
7 1 [doz Woollen Comforters] 5.25
2⅜ 1 [doz] Ivory Combs 1.00
2⅞ 1 [doz Ivory Combs] 1.31
11/ 12 [doz] Super fine [Combs] 8/ 6 0.97
[doz] Super fine [Combs] 1.75
[doz] Super fine [Combs] 1.88
4 [doz] Super fine [Combs] 2.00
1 pr Green Berage [Barrage?] 12 4/ 6.00
3 [pr] Pongees 8.00 24.00
2224 1 [pr] Merino Cloth 1.75 11.81
2293 1 [pr] super Crimson [Cloth] <​Error​> 24⅛ 1.75 18.22
3 [pr] double Foundation 11/ 4.12
1 1 [pr] 6/ 4 Cambric 12 31 3.72
2 1 [pr 6/ 4 Cambric] 12 35 4.20
5 1 [pr 6/ 4 Cambric] 12 44 5.28
7 1 [pr 6/ 4 Cambric] 12 50 6.00
1 1 [pr] 4/ 4 Bobbinet Lace 20 25 5.00
5057 1 [pr] super [Lace] 10¾ 75 8.07
11008 1 [pr] 6/ 4 Book Muslin 10 32½ 3.25
10 1 [pr Book Muslin] 10 45 4.50
46 1 [pr Book Muslin] 10 62½ 6.25
1 1 [pr] Gimp Inserting 23 12 2.76
4 4 [pr Gimp Inserting] 101 15 15.15
370 1 [pr] Cotton Edging 3 doz 1/ 6 0.56
2,442.54
[p. [3]]
Am[oun]t bro[ugh]t over 2,442.54
466 2 p[ai]r Cotton Edging 6 doz[en] 25 1 50
90 1 [pr Cotton Edging] 4 [doz] 3/ 6 1.75
1 [pr Cotton Edging] 3⅓ 3/ 6 1.46
478 1 [pr Cotton] Inserting 3 6/ 2.25
7 [pr] Blk silk Braids 3/ 2.62
12 [pr] Col[ore]d [silk Braids] 2/6 3.75
2 [pr] Crimson pongee Hdkfs [Handkerchiefs] 5.00 10.00
1 [pr] Printed [pongee Hdkfs] 5.00
1 [pr] silk Flaggs 6.25
1 [pr silk Flaggs] 6.50
1 [pr] Crimson Bandanna [Hdkfs] 6.75
6 4/ 4 Scarlet Herbot shawls 0.80 4.80
8 5/ 4 [Scarlet Herbot shawls] 2.25 18.00
305 6 7/ 4 Sarlet Merno [Scarlet Merino] [shawls] 5.75 34.50
2448 1 [7/ 4 Scarlet Merino shawls] 6 75
3 [7/ 4 Scarlet] super [Merino shawls] 7.25 21.75
2 [7/ 4] Black [Merino shawls] 6.25 12.50
6 scarlet Valerna [shawls] 9/ 6.75
1 pr 6/ 4 Black Bombazine 10 1.75 17.50
6 Book Aprons 8/ 6.00
72 1 doz[en] Warm Blk silk Gloves 7.50
18 1 [doz Warm] Wht [silk Gloves] 7.50
1 [doz] Super Castor 6.00
2 [doz Super] H.S [Gloves] 5.00 10.00
1 [doz] Mens supr [H.S Gloves] 12.00
4 [doz Mens] Buck[skin] Gloves 11.50 46.00
2 [doz Mens Buck] Mittens 10.00 20.00
25 12 [doz] Cotton Tapes 1/ 1.50
135 6 [doz Cotton Tapes] 2/ 1.50
145 6 [doz Cotton Tapes] 3/ 2.25
12 [doz] Spools 4/ 6 6.75
350 1 [doz] Fansy Gilt Vest Buttons 2.50
304 1 [doz] Plain [Gilt Vest Buttons] 1.75
601 1 [doz] super fig[ure]d Coat [Buttons] 6.00
3 1 [doz] Lasting over Coat [Buttons] 1.12
1½ [doz] Twill Tapes 4/6 0.84
2 [doz] Quality Binding 6/ 1.50
Carried to No. 2 $2,753.63
[p. [4]]
No. 2
, October 11 1836
Messr
Bought of KEELER, McNEIL & Co.
WHOLESALE DEALERS IN FANCY AND STAPLE DRY GOODS,
14 BROAD STREET,
NEXT DOOR TO THE EXCHANGE HOTEL.
amo[un]t bro[ugh]t from No. [Number] 1— 2753.63
6 3 Packs London pins 4/ 6 1.69
5 3 [Packs] German [pins] 7/ 2.62
3 [Packs] Pattent [pins] 9/ 3.38
25 5 lb assorted pattens thread 8/ 5.00
1 [lb] Ball Twist 12.00
1 [lb] assorted sewings 10.50
2 [lb] Blue silk 11.00 22.00
2 [lb Blue] super [silk] 11.50 23.00
6 Gingham Umbrellas 1.75 10.50
6 Wheel top [Umbrellas] 2.00 12.00
6 32in [Wheel top Umbrellas] 2.25 13.50
579 1 Bale Chickcoper Sheetings 614 13½ 82.89 <​2,952.71​>
4 Boxes 3/ 12/ 1/ 10/ strapping 8/ 6.75
2,959.46
Rec[eive]d Note 6 Mo[nth]s. Oct 11 payl 14 Broad. 1,479.73
1,479.73
2,959.46
Keeler McNeil & Co
G M Gardner [10 lines blank] [p. [5]]
Keeler, McNeil & Co
Dry Goods
$2,959.46
Error on 1st Sheet
$24 under Chgd [Charged]
 
Examined
MFC [Marcellus Cowdery] [p. [6]]

Footnotes

  1. new scribe logo

    Printed text ends; unidentified handwriting resumes.  

  2. 1

    A ribbed cotton cloth in which the warp passes over many weft threads to form cords. (“Canton,” in Montgomery, Textiles in America, 191.)  

    Montgomery, Florence M. Textiles in America: 1650–1870. New York: W. W. Norton & Company, 1984.

  3. 2

    A type of coarse, napped, woolen cloth. (“Frieze,” in Harmuth, Dictionary of Textiles, 68.)  

    Harmuth, Louis. Dictionary of Textiles. New York: Fairchild Publishing Company, 1915.

  4. 3

    Any type of woven cloth patterned with a “small, diamond pattern with a dot in the center,” resembling a bird’s eye. (“Birdseye,” in Harmuth, Dictionary of Textiles, 20; “Bird’s-eye,” in Montgomery, Textiles in America, 169.)  

    Harmuth, Louis. Dictionary of Textiles. New York: Fairchild Publishing Company, 1915.

    Montgomery, Florence M. Textiles in America: 1650–1870. New York: W. W. Norton & Company, 1984.

  5. 4

    A linen or cotton twill woven fabric with a diamond pattern. (“Diaper,” in Montgomery, Textiles in America, 218.)  

    Montgomery, Florence M. Textiles in America: 1650–1870. New York: W. W. Norton & Company, 1984.

  6. 5

    TEXT: Or “Bu”.  

  7. 6

    A strong linen or cotton fabric often used for trousers or military uniforms. (“Drill,” in Montgomery, Textiles in America, 225; “Drill,” in Harmuth, Dictionary of Textiles, 57.)  

    Montgomery, Florence M. Textiles in America: 1650–1870. New York: W. W. Norton & Company, 1984.

    Harmuth, Louis. Dictionary of Textiles. New York: Fairchild Publishing Company, 1915.

  8. 7

    Heavy woolen or worsted fabrics of various weaves and patterns, used for outergarments made from mohair, the wool of the Angora goat. (“Coating,” in Harmuth, Dictionary of Textiles, 41; “Mohair,” in Montgomery, Textiles in America, 297.)  

    Harmuth, Louis. Dictionary of Textiles. New York: Fairchild Publishing Company, 1915.

    Montgomery, Florence M. Textiles in America: 1650–1870. New York: W. W. Norton & Company, 1984.

  9. 8

    A bluish-gray woolen fabric, fulled and shorn, often used for uniforms in military schools. (“Cadet Cloth,” in Harmuth, Dictionary of Textiles, 30.)  

    Harmuth, Louis. Dictionary of Textiles. New York: Fairchild Publishing Company, 1915.

  10. new scribe logo

    Endorsement in handwriting of Newel K. Whitney.  

  11. new scribe logo

    Endorsement in handwriting of Newel K. Whitney.  

  12. 9

    Cloth made from the wool of Merino sheep. (“Merino,” in Montgomery, Textiles in America, 294.)  

    Montgomery, Florence M. Textiles in America: 1650–1870. New York: W. W. Norton & Company, 1984.

  13. 10

    A “cotton cloth of plain, sometimes damask or diaper weave, made with hard spun, fine warp, often taped and a much coarser, slack twist filling, printed with flowers, birds, and other patterns, in bright colors on white or colored ground, and glazed by calendaring.” Often used for furniture or drapery. (“Chintz,” in Harmuth, Dictionary of Textiles, 39.)  

    Harmuth, Louis. Dictionary of Textiles. New York: Fairchild Publishing Company, 1915.

  14. 11

    Braids were woven or plaited fabric that was flat, round, or tubular; they were used for binding or trimming. (“Braid,” in Harmuth, Dictionary of Textiles, 24.)  

    Harmuth, Louis. Dictionary of Textiles. New York: Fairchild Publishing Company, 1915.

  15. 12

    Cotton goods manufactured in the United States. (“Domestics,” in Montgomery, Textiles in America, 222; “Domestics,” in Harmuth, Dictionary of Textiles, 54.)  

    Montgomery, Florence M. Textiles in America: 1650–1870. New York: W. W. Norton & Company, 1984.

    Harmuth, Louis. Dictionary of Textiles. New York: Fairchild Publishing Company, 1915.

  16. new scribe logo

    Graphite insertion in unidentified handwriting.  

  17. 13

    A camblet or camlet was a plain weave used for clothing, furniture, and hangings; made from goat’s hair, part silk or linen, or wool. (“Camlet,” in Montgomery, Textiles in America, 188.)  

    Montgomery, Florence M. Textiles in America: 1650–1870. New York: W. W. Norton & Company, 1984.

  18. 14

    A generic name for fine white linen cloth. (“Holland,” in Montgomery, Textiles in America, 258–259.)  

    Montgomery, Florence M. Textiles in America: 1650–1870. New York: W. W. Norton & Company, 1984.

  19. new scribe logo

    Graphite insertion in unidentified handwriting.  

  20. 15

    TEXT: Graphite overwritten by ink.  

  21. 16

    A generic name for fine white linen cloth. (“Holland,” in Montgomery, Textiles in America, 258–259.)  

    Montgomery, Florence M. Textiles in America: 1650–1870. New York: W. W. Norton & Company, 1984.

  22. 17

    A stout and soft dress silk with fine cross ribs on one or both sides of the cloth. (“Peau de Soie,” in Harmuth, Dictionary of Textiles, 118.)  

    Harmuth, Louis. Dictionary of Textiles. New York: Fairchild Publishing Company, 1915.

  23. 18

    A French silk fabric with cross ribs on the face. (“Gros de Suisse,” in Harmuth, Dictionary of Textiles, 74.)  

    Harmuth, Louis. Dictionary of Textiles. New York: Fairchild Publishing Company, 1915.

  24. 19

    A fabric having a colored design on the textile face. (“Figured,” in Harmuth, Dictionary of Textiles, 64.)  

    Harmuth, Louis. Dictionary of Textiles. New York: Fairchild Publishing Company, 1915.

  25. 20

    Cloth made from the wool of Merino sheep. (“Merino,” in Montgomery, Textiles in America, 294.)  

    Montgomery, Florence M. Textiles in America: 1650–1870. New York: W. W. Norton & Company, 1984.

  26. 21

    A “plain woven or twilled coarse, open fabric” made of hemp, cotton yarn, or hair. It was used for hat shapes if sized; when not lined, it was used for under-lining and as a stiffener for clothes. (“Buckram,” in Harmuth, Dictionary of Textiles, 27.)  

    Harmuth, Louis. Dictionary of Textiles. New York: Fairchild Publishing Company, 1915.

  27. 22

    A generic term for fabric intended to manufacture waistcoats. (“Vesting,” in Montgomery, Textiles in America, 372.)  

    Montgomery, Florence M. Textiles in America: 1650–1870. New York: W. W. Norton & Company, 1984.

  28. 23

    Probably intended as “toilinet” or “toilinette,” a fabric made of silk, cotton, and wool, typically used for waistcoats. (“Toilinet,” in Montgomery, Textiles in America, 367; “Toilinet or Toilinette,” in Harmuth, Dictionary of Textiles, 156.)  

    Montgomery, Florence M. Textiles in America: 1650–1870. New York: W. W. Norton & Company, 1984.

    Harmuth, Louis. Dictionary of Textiles. New York: Fairchild Publishing Company, 1915.

  29. 24

    A patterned French linen used for inexpensive clothing and furniture. (“Barrage,” in Montgomery, Textiles in America, 157.)  

    Montgomery, Florence M. Textiles in America: 1650–1870. New York: W. W. Norton & Company, 1984.

  30. 25

    A clothing and curtain fabric with Chinese origins woven from uneven threads of silk. It was originally a tan color but in the early nineteenth century was often dyed. (“Pongee,” in Montgomery, Textiles in America, 327.)  

    Montgomery, Florence M. Textiles in America: 1650–1870. New York: W. W. Norton & Company, 1984.

  31. 26

    Cloth made from the wool of Merino sheep. (“Merino,” in Montgomery, Textiles in America, 294.)  

    Montgomery, Florence M. Textiles in America: 1650–1870. New York: W. W. Norton & Company, 1984.

  32. new scribe logo

    Insertion in light brown ink in unidentified handwriting.  

  33. 27

    Possibly an inexpensive type of fabric or fur used as backing for hats or other garments. (“Foundation,” in Oxford English Dictionary, 4:493.)  

    The Oxford English Dictionary. Edited by James A. H. Murray, Henry Bradley, W. A. Craigie, and C. T. Onions. 12 vols. 1933. Reprint, Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1970.

  34. 28

    A light, plain woven fabric typically made from cotton or linen. (“Cambric,” in Harmuth, Dictionary of Textiles, 31.)  

    Harmuth, Louis. Dictionary of Textiles. New York: Fairchild Publishing Company, 1915.

  35. 29

    Bobbinet was a “machine-made, hexagonal net, used for quillings, trimmings, etc.” It is also possible that the clerk made an error here and was referring instead to bobbin lace, a type of lace made by working bobbins or bones around pins in a cushion to produce a pattern. (“Bobbinnet,” in Harmuth, Dictionary of Textiles, 22; “Bobbin Lace,” in Montgomery, Textiles in America, 171.)  

    Harmuth, Louis. Dictionary of Textiles. New York: Fairchild Publishing Company, 1915.

    Montgomery, Florence M. Textiles in America: 1650–1870. New York: W. W. Norton & Company, 1984.

  36. 30

    In the context of textiles, the term “book” is “derived from the booklike form in which some of the finer calicoes were folded and marketed in India.” A bookfold involved the fabric being “folded once lengthwise and twice crosswise.” (“Muslin,” in Montgomery, Textiles in America, 304; “Bookfold,” in Harmuth, Dictionary of Textiles, 23.)  

    Montgomery, Florence M. Textiles in America: 1650–1870. New York: W. W. Norton & Company, 1984.

    Harmuth, Louis. Dictionary of Textiles. New York: Fairchild Publishing Company, 1915.

  37. 31

    Trimmings for dresses, furniture, and coach lace making. Plaited or twisted strands are used to form a pattern. (“Gimp,” in Montgomery, Textiles in America, 246.)  

    Montgomery, Florence M. Textiles in America: 1650–1870. New York: W. W. Norton & Company, 1984.

  38. 32

    Braids were woven or plaited fabric that was flat, round, or tubular; they were used for binding or trimming. (“Braid,” in Harmuth, Dictionary of Textiles, 24.)  

    Harmuth, Louis. Dictionary of Textiles. New York: Fairchild Publishing Company, 1915.

  39. 33

    A clothing and curtain fabric with Chinese origins woven from uneven threads of silk. It was originally a tan color but in the early nineteenth century was often dyed. (“Pongee,” in Montgomery, Textiles in America, 327.)  

    Montgomery, Florence M. Textiles in America: 1650–1870. New York: W. W. Norton & Company, 1984.

  40. 34

    TEXT: Or “Hubot”.  

  41. 35

    Cloth made from the wool of Merino sheep. (“Merino,” in Montgomery, Textiles in America, 294.)  

    Montgomery, Florence M. Textiles in America: 1650–1870. New York: W. W. Norton & Company, 1984.

  42. 36

    Cloth made of silk warp and worsted weft in a serge or twill weave. Black bombazine was used for mourning garments. (“Bombazine,” in Montgomery, Textiles in America, 172, 175.)  

    Montgomery, Florence M. Textiles in America: 1650–1870. New York: W. W. Norton & Company, 1984.

  43. 37

    In the context of textiles, the term “book” is “derived from the booklike form in which some of the finer calicoes were folded and marketed in India.” A bookfold involved the fabric being “folded once lengthwise and twice crosswise.” (“Muslin,” in Montgomery, Textiles in America, 304; “Bookfold,” in Harmuth, Dictionary of Textiles, 23.)  

    Montgomery, Florence M. Textiles in America: 1650–1870. New York: W. W. Norton & Company, 1984.

    Harmuth, Louis. Dictionary of Textiles. New York: Fairchild Publishing Company, 1915.

  44. 38

    A “heavy, stout, fulled and calendered broadcloth overcoating.” (“Castor,” in Harmuth, Dictionary of Textiles, 35.)  

    Harmuth, Louis. Dictionary of Textiles. New York: Fairchild Publishing Company, 1915.

  45. 39

    A fabric having a colored design on the textile face. (“Figured,” in Harmuth, Dictionary of Textiles, 64.)  

    Harmuth, Louis. Dictionary of Textiles. New York: Fairchild Publishing Company, 1915.

  46. 40

    This refers to everlasting, a stout, tightly woven cloth generally used for ladies’ shoes. It was also used in the nineteenth-century United States for lightweight summer coats. (“Everlasting,” in Montgomery, Textiles in America, 235–236.)  

    Montgomery, Florence M. Textiles in America: 1650–1870. New York: W. W. Norton & Company, 1984.

  47. new scribe logo

    Printed form resumes.  

  48. new scribe logo

    Printed text ends; unidentified handwriting resumes.  

  49. 41

    Another term for cotton yarn. (“Twist,” in Harmuth, Dictionary of Textiles, 159.)  

    Harmuth, Louis. Dictionary of Textiles. New York: Fairchild Publishing Company, 1915.

  50. 42

    Umbrellas with a manufactured top that secured ribs supporting the umbrella in place. (Andrews, Bygone England, 126–127.)  

    Andrews, William. Bygone England: Social Studies in Its Historic Byways and Highways. London: Hutchinson and Co., 1892.

  51. 43

    TEXT: Or “Shirtings”.  

  52. new scribe logo

    Graphite insertion in unidentified handwriting.  

  53. new scribe logo

    Unidentified handwriting ends; second unidentified handwriting—probably G. M. Gardner—begins.  

  54. new scribe logo

    Docket in handwriting of Marcellus Cowdery in black ink.  

  55. new scribe logo

    Notation in handwriting of Marcellus Cowdery in light brown ink.  

  56. new scribe logo

    Docket in handwriting of Marcellus Cowdery in graphite.