Invoice, Winthrop Eaton to Rigdon, Smith & Cowdery, 11 October 1836

  • Source Note
  • Historical Introduction

Document Transcript

Oct. 11th. 1836
Mess[rs]
Bo[ugh]t. of
#1. 1 doz[en] Spanish Caps 108.00
1 [doz] fur caps 96.00
1 [doz fur caps] 84.00
1 [doz fur caps] fur bands 96.00
1 [doz fur caps] 72.00
1 [doz fur caps] 48.00
1 [doz] Coney [caps] 30.00
1 [doz] Mens Hair Seal Caps 9.00
1 [doz] Boys [Hair Seal Caps] 7.50
1 [doz] Mens Caps 36.00
1 [doz] Spanish Caps 72.00
1/2 [doz Spanish Caps] $144.00 72.00
8 fine Otter Caps 17.00 136.00
#2 2 doz Collars 16.00 32.00
1 [doz] Misses Rubber Aprons $14.00 14.00
2 [doz] ladies [Rubber Aprons] $16.00 32.00
7½ [doz] fur gloves $15.75 118.13
2 Cap Boxes 6/— 1.50
Cooperage 2 Boxes cr/— Cartage 3/— 0.88
1½ doz Seal Collars $36.00 54.00
1 [doz] Nutria [Collars] 24.00
$1143.01
Rec[eive]d Payment by Note at 6 Mo[nths] /d payable at
John W Valentine [p. [1]]
Caps
$1143.01
 
[p. [2]]

Footnotes

  1. 1

    A garment used by women during menstruation. (Vostral, Under Wraps, 64; “A New Article,” New-York Spectator, 1 Oct. 1835, [3]; Burton’s Comic Songster, 37.)  

    Vostral, Sharra L. Under Wraps: A History of Menstrual Hygiene Technology. Lanham, MD: Lexington Books, 2008.

    New-York Spectator. New York City. 1804–1867.

    Burton, W. E., ed. Burton’s Comic Songster: Being Entirely a New Collection of Original and Popular Songs, as Sung by Mr. Burton, Mr. Tyrone Power, Mr. John Reeve, Mr. Hadaway, &c. &c. Philadelphia: James Kay Jr. and Brother, 1837.

  2. 2

    The cost associated with transporting goods, which were originally transported by cart. (“Cartage,” in American Dictionary [1828].)  

    An American Dictionary of the English Language: Intended to Exhibit, I. the Origin, Affinities and Primary Signification of English Words, as far as They Have Been Ascertained. . . . Edited by Noah Webster. New York: S. Converse, 1828.

  3. 3

    TEXT: Inscribed in graphite over “54.00” is “106501”.  

  4. 4

    An aquatic rodent native to South America, also known as coypu. Its pelt was popular in the fur trade beginning in the nineteenth century, and it was sometimes erroneously or colloquially called an otter. (“Copyu,” in Encyclopedia Americana, 8:142.)  

    The Encyclopedia Americana: A Library of Universal Knowledge. 30 vols. New York: Encyclopedia Americana Corporation, 1918.

  5. new scribe logo

    Dockets in handwriting of Marcellus Cowdery.