Journal, 1839

  • Source Note
  • Historical Introduction

Document Transcript

<​Minute Book.​>
<​1839​>
<​J. Smiths Journal​>
<​Escape from Prison​>
[front cover]
1839.
16 April 1839 • Tuesday
Aprile 16 th
22–23 April 1839 • Monday–Tuesday
President Smith and his fellow prisoners, at Ill. on Tuesday Monday the 22nd of April and spent all next day greeting and receiving visits from his brethren and friends——
24 April–3 May 1839 • Wednesday–Friday
In the evening of the 24th met in council with the Church—when a committee was appointed to go to &c. of which he was one. & returned on friday the 3rd May—
4 May 1839 • Saturday
Saturday 4 th May presided at general near Ill.
5 May 1839 • Sunday
Sunday Do [ditto] continued.
6 May 1839 • Monday
Monday <​6th​> met in council with the [an]d others Ill—
7 May 1839 • Tuesday
Tuesday Do [ditto]—— Do Do
10 May 1839 • Friday
May 10, with his family To Hancock Co. Ill.
13–14 May 1839 • Monday–Tuesday
Monday 13 th Transacted various business with &c at home attending to general business—
Tuesday Do [ditto] wednesday, Do
14–19 May 1839 • Tuesday–Sunday
On the 14 I returned to so kept no record <​Minute​> of course, I got back here Sunday ev[en]ing the 19 th May. [p. [1]]
20–24 May 1839 • Monday–Friday
Monday 20th this week at home and employed dictating letters and attending to the various business of the Church
25 May 1839 • Saturday
On Saturday 25, met in with the , and others of the church . case disposed of—
26 May 1839 • Sunday
Sunday at home, Elder & preached
27 May–8 June 1839 • Monday–Saturday
Monday 27th and beginning of the week at home, latter part of week he, (President Smith) went to with others of the and returned on Wednesday 5th June Spent greater part of latter part study and Latter part at home
9 June 1839 • Sunday
Sunday 11th <​9th​> at meeting with and family at <​ pre[ach]ed one woman​>
10 June 1839 • Monday
Monday 12th <​10th​> began to study & prepare to dictate history—
11 June 1839 • Tuesday
Tuesday and I to write history—
12–14 June 1839 • Wednesday–Friday
wednesday Thursday & Friday Generally so employed
15 June 1839 • Saturday
Saturday 15th June left home with his family on a visit [p. [2]]

Editorial Note
JS’s departure on 15 June began an eleven-day visit to his brother , at , Hancock County, and brother , near , McDonough County, Illinois. He also met with his brother while in . The following three journal entries record ’s observations in the area during JS’s absence.

16 June 1839 • Sunday
Sunday 16th Meeting held Brs Rose and presiding I was present and considered that Br Rose <​spoke​> not <​in​> acco[r]dance with the doctrines of the Church, nor with the Spirit of God Others thought so too——
preached at ——
arrived here—
17 June 1839 • Monday
Monday 17th , arrived returned to on [blank]
18 June 1839 • Tuesday
Tuesday evening, Br Rose one man named [blank] at ’s place

Editorial Note
When JS returned to , he reported his activities to . The scribe recorded another journal entry for 15 June and continued with retrospective entries of JS’s travel and activities while away from Commerce visiting his brothers.

15–17 June 1839 • Saturday–Monday
<​15th June​> Started on Saturday morning with my family— on a visit to met on the prairie, found him in good spirits— went with him to his house <​in — C.​>, found his family all well staid over night, and had a very satisfactory visit. Next day went on to Br s, near <​the village of​> . Staid there untill monday, and there met with br , who I had not before seen since our deliverance from prison.
18 June 1839 • Tuesday
Tuesday 18th went to a the house of a man by the name of Mathews, during the [p. [3]] evening the neighbors came in, and I gave them a short discourse,
20 June 1839 • Thursday
Thursday following went to Elder , from there were invited to visit a brother br Vance’s which wee did and there gave to the brethren and friends of the Neigborhood, a brief history or account of the coming forth of the Book of Mormon,
22–23 June 1839 • Saturday–Sunday
Saturday 22nd we returned to place, And on Sunday went to Br Wilcox’s and there preached to a very crowded congregation and so eager were they to hear that a part of them stood out in the rain during the sermon, & <​in​> general they all expressed good satisfaction as to what they had heard.
24–25 June 1839 • Monday–Tuesday
Monday 24th started for home and got as far as , near , Hancock Co— when they insisted that we should tarry, and on Tuesday we held meeting, and spoke with considerable liberty to a large congregation,
26 June 1839 • Wednesday
Wednesday 26th arrived all safe & sound, at home,— Ill.,

Editorial Note
Contemporaneous journal keeping resumed at about this point in the journal.

27 June 1839 • Thursday
Thursday, attended a [p. 4] of the — at which time Br , made his confession and was restored to the again,
28 June 1839 • Friday
Friday transacting business of various kinds, Counseling the brethren &c &c
29 June 1839 • Saturday
Saturday at home principally
30 June 1839 • Sunday
Sunday at Meeting at Bore testimony to a crowded audience concerning the truth of this work & also of the truth of the Book of Mormon &c. &c.
1 July 1839 • Monday
Monday 1rst July, Spent the day principally counseling with the Brethren—
2 July 1839 • Tuesday
Tuesday, Spent this day— on the side of the [Mississippi] river Forenoon went in company with Elders & , Bishops & and others to visit a purchase lately made by as a location for a town,
Advised that a town be built there,
Afternoon, met with the & Some of the who are about to proceed on their mission to Europe. the nations of the earth, and the Islands of the sea, The meeting was [p. 5] opened by singing and prayer after which The proceeded to bless two of the Twelve, who had lately been into that quorum viz: & & one of the Seventies viz after which a blessing<​s​> was <​were​> also pronounced by them on the heads of the wives of <​some of​> those about to <​go​> abroad. The meeting was then addressed by President , by way of advice to the Twelve &c &c chiefly concerning the nature of their mission, their practicing prudence & charity humility in their plans <​or subjects​> of for preaching, the necessity of their not trifling with their office, and of holding on strictly to the importance of their mission & the authority of the . —— I—— (President Joseph Smith Jr) then addresst them, and gave much instruction calculated to if guard them against selfsufficiency, selfrighteousness & selfimportance, touching upon many subjects of importance & value to all who wish to walk humbly before the Lord, but especialy teaching them [p. 6[a]] to observe charity & wisdom, & fellow feeling with Love, one towards another in all things & under all circumstances.
3 July 1839 • Wednesday
Wednesday July 3rd, Dr & him by the water edge— about two hours afterwards, him to the office of an .
Aftrenoon dictating History—
4–5 July 1839 • Thursday–Friday
Thursday & Friday (assisted by Br ) dictating History
6 July 1839 • Saturday
Saturday also at home Studying Church records &c &c
7 July 1839 • Sunday
Sunday July 7 th Meeting held in the open air as a large assemblage was expected to witness <​Lis[ten] to​> the farewell addresses of the who were then about to take their departure on this most important mission. <​viz​> to the nations of the earth, and the Islands of the sea Elder , being the first of the 12 present, opened the meeting by addressing a few words <​of an​> introductory nature after which singing and prayer were observed, when , delivered a very interesting discource on the subject of the Book of Mormon recapitulating in short terms the subjects of a former discourse on the same subject— [p. 6[b]] and afterwards proceeded to read portions from the the Bible and Book of Mormon concerning the best criterions whereby to judge of its authenticity. And then went on to show that no impostor would ever attempt to make such promises as are contained [in] pages 541 and 34th which he did in a very satisfactory manner. <​& then bore testimony​> after which the meeting adjourned for one hour,—— Afternoon—— The meeting was again opened by prayer &c Elder spoke on the subject of this — The other angel which John saw.— having the everlasting gospel to preach &c &—— <​hee then bore testimony of the truth of the Book of Mormon &c &c​>
s address went chiefly to exhortation to the Saints to perseverance after which he bore his testimony also.
Eder next came forward and having alluded to his own late fall, exhorted all to perseverance in the things of God, expressed himself one with his brethren, and bore testimony to his knowledge of the truth and the misery of falling from it.
Elder made some very appropriate remarks, and also bore testimony to the truth of these [p. 7] things, and gave an invitation to come forward and be when three manifested their determination to renounce the world. and take upon themselves the name of Jesus Christ.
One brother was then after which President addressed the meeting in a very feeling manner, showing that it must be no small matter which <​could​> induce men to leave their families and their homes to travel over all the earth, amidst persecutions and trials such as always followed the preaching of this gospel; he then addressed himself to the twelve and gave them some cou[n]sel and consolation— as far as in his power. after which I (JS—) requested their prayers & promised to pray for them &c &c
The meeting was large & respectable a large number were present who did not belong to our Church The most perfect order prevailed throughout, The meeting dismissed about 1/2 past five oclock. when we repaired to the waters and the three candidates were baptized & confirmed. [p. 8]

Editorial Note
Beginning in late June, malaria borne by the mosquitoes that infested the area’s swamplands spread among the Latter-day Saints. later recounted that “a majority of the people were prostrated with malignant fevers, agues, etc.” JS spent most of this week and much of the following month ministering to the sick. Having been recently driven from , many still lived in crowded, ramshackle accommodations. Zina Huntington, whose mother died of the sickness 8 July, later recounted that JS “saw to our being taken care of, as well as circumstances would permit—for there were hundreds, lying in tents and wagons, who needed care as much as we. Once Joseph came himself and made us tea with his own hands, and comforted the sick and dying.” Among the sick were JS’s and apparently his son . later recounted that JS “had taken the sick into his house and dooryard until his house was like an hospital, and he had attended upon them until he was taken sick himself and confined to his bed several days.”

8–20 July 1839 • Monday–Saturday
Monday Tuesday & Wednesday selecting Hymns, with the
About this time sickiness began to manifest itself much amongst the brethren as well as among the inhabitants of the place, so that this week and next was generally spent in visiting the sick, and unto them, some had faith enough and were healed, others had not,
21 July 1839 • Sunday
Sunday the 21rst no meeting on account of much rain, and much sickness, however, many of the sick were <​on​> this day, raised up by the power of God, through the instrumentality of the Elders of Israel in the name of Jesus Christ
22–23 July 1839 • Monday–Tuesday
Monday & Tuesday <​also​> the sick were , with great success but many still remain sick & new cases occurring daily.
28 July–3 August 1839 • Sunday–Saturday
Sunday 28 meeting held as usual. B[rother] , preached, on the , and in the evening afternoon addressed the church, on the necessity of keeping the commandments of God. [p. 9] After which I spoke & admonished the church individually to set his house in order, to make clean the insid[e of] the platter, and to meet on the next sabbath to partake of in order that by our obedieence to the , we might be enabled to prevail with God against the destroyer, and that the sick may be .
All this week chiefly spent among the sick, who in general are gaining strength, and recovering health
4 August 1839 • Sunday
Sunday 5th <​4th​> August, Church came together for prayer meeting and , Exhorted the Church at length, concerning the necessity of being righteous and clean at heart before the Lord, many others also spoke, especially some of the who were present, professed their willingness to proceed on their mission to Europe, without either purse or Scrip &c &c &c
the sacrament was administered a spirit of humility and harmony prevailed, and the church passed a resolution that the 12 proceed as soon as possible and that they would provide for their families—— [p. 10]
11–17 August 1839 • Sunday–Saturday
Sunday 11th At meeting
forenoon
a Sermon by
afternoon 1 and 4 viz Br Hibbard his wife & little son & daughter. <​& administered​>
This week chiefly spent visiting the sick, sickness much decreased——
News from By [blank lines]
18–24 August 1839 • Sunday–Saturday
Sunday 18th not at meeting
Self and wife rode out——
forenoon
Sermon by
on the order & plan of creation
3
Afternoon three and one an
This week chiefly spent among the sick also,
New purchase made
25–31 August 1839 • Sunday–Saturday
Sunday 25th at meeting
<​Sickness decreasing​>
1–7 September 1839 • Sunday–Saturday
Sunday 1rst Septr, at meeting also, Spoke concerning some errors [p. [11]] in br ’s works &c &c &c
This week sickness much decreased
8–14 September 1839 • Sunday–Saturday
Sunday 8th Septe— — — —
[blank line]
Monday & greater part of week visiting the sick and attending to business of the new town &c &c
Friday at noon left home for Brother s place <​returned home Saturday evening.​>
15 September 1839 • Sunday
Sunday 15th visiting the sick
16–21 September 1839 • Monday–Saturday
Monday 16th and greater part of the went to and returned and greater part of the week arranging business of town lots &c
Wednesday went to and returned on Thursday evening
Friday and Saturday at home
22–28 September 1839 • Sunday–Saturday
Sunday 22nd attended & presided at meeting— Spoke concerning the <​other​> comforter &c &c &c
This week transacting various business at home greater part of time except when visiting the sick, all in general except recovering but some very slowly
29 September–6 October 1839 • Sunday–Sunday
Sunday 29th Meeting at own house After others had spoken, Spoke and explained concerning uselessness of preaching [p. 12] to the world about great judgements but rather to preach the simple gospel— Explained concerning the coming of the son of Man &c that all will be raised to meet him but the righteous will remain with him in the cloud whilst all the proud and all that do wickedly will have to return to the earth, and suffer his vengeance which he will take upon them this is the second death &c &c
Also that it is a false idea that the saints will escape all the judgements whilst the wicked suffer— for all flesh is subject to suffer— and “the righteous shall hardly escape” still many of the saints will escape— for the just shall live by faith— yet many of the righteous shall fall a prey to disease to pestilence &c and yet &c by reason of the weakness of the flesh and yet be saved in the kingdom of God So that it is an unhallowed principle to say that such and such have transgressed because they have been preyed upon by disease or death for all flesh is subject to death and the Saviour has said, “Judge not “lest ye be judged”.
All the fore part of this week at home and preparing for Thursday met in council and on
Saturday 5th October 1839 which continued Saturday and Sunday— the assemb [p. [13]]lage was very large— a great deal of business was transacted, and great instruction given
See Conference Minutes—
6–12 October 1839 • Sunday–Saturday
Week beginning Sunday 6th october
after busied in attending to general affairs of the Church— principally about home
13 October 1839 • Sunday
Sunday 13th at meeting in the meeting small on account of cold weather
15 October 1839 • Tuesday
Tuesday 15th oct r afternoon went to in company with and Quite a number of families moving in— [1/2 page blank] [p. [14]]

Footnotes

  1. 1

    While being taken from Gallatin, Daviess County, Missouri, to Columbia, Boone County, Missouri, in compliance with a change of venue in their legal case, JS and fellow prisoners escaped with the cooperation of their guards near Yellow Creek. Some sources point to the possibility that the prisoners were intended to be held without bail—as hostages—until their people evacuated Missouri. If that was the case, the purpose of their incarceration was now largely fulfilled. (Promissory Note, JS to John Brassfield, 16 Apr. 1839, JS Collection, CHL; compare JS, Journal, 28 Feb. 1843, JS Collection, CHL; see also Madsen, “Missouri Court of Inquiry”; Hyrum Smith, Testimony, 1 July 1843, Nauvoo Municipal Court Docket Book, 78; and Lyman Wight, Testimony, 1 July 1843, Nauvoo Municipal Court Docket Book, 131–132.)  

    Smith, Joseph. Collection, 1827–1846. CHL. MS 155.

    Madsen, Gordon A. “Joseph Smith and the Missouri Court of Inquiry: Austin A. King’s Quest for Hostages.” BYU Studies 43, no. 4 (2004): 93–136.

    Nauvoo Municipal Court Docket Book / Nauvoo, IL, Municipal Court. “Docket of the Municipal Court of the City of Nauvoo,” ca. 1843–1845. In Historian's Office, Historical Record Book, 1843–1874, pp. 51–150 and pp. 1–19 (second numbering). CHL. MS 3434.

  2. 2

    In his own journal, James Mulholland noted that on this day he began again to “write for the Church.” (Mulholland, Journal, 22 Apr. 1839.)  

    Mulholland, James. Journal, Apr.–Oct. 1839. In Joseph Smith, Journal, Sept.–Oct. 1838. Joseph Smith Collection. CHL. MS 155, box 1, fd. 4.

  3. 3

    In addition to JS, this committee, which was assigned to visit Iowa “for the purpose of making locations for the church,” also included Vinson Knight and Alanson Ripley. The council determined that church members should “move on to the north as soon as they possibly can.”a The committee left Quincy the following day, 25 April 1839, to assess possibilities on both the Iowa and Illinois sides of the Mississippi River. The initial acquisitions of land in the area of Commerce, Illinois, occurred on 30 April. They consisted of 47.17 acres located south of Commerce from Isaac Galland, two additional parcels totaling 12.2 acres from Galland, and about 130 acres from Hugh White.b The church purchased additional land from Galland in Lee County, Iowa, in May and June. Deeds list a total of 18,920 acres in Iowa purchased from Galland by the church.c  

    General Church Minutes, 1839–1877. CHL. CR 100 318.

    JS History / Smith, Joseph, et al. History, 1838–1856. Vols. A-1–F-1 (original), A-2–E-2 (fair copy). Historian’s Office, History of the Church, 1839–ca. 1882. CHL. CR 100 102, boxes 1–7. The history for the period after 5 Aug. 1838 was composed after the death of Joseph Smith.

    U.S. and Canada Record Collection. FHL.

    Historian’s Office. Joseph Smith History Documents, 1839–1860. CHL. CR 100 396.

    (aGeneral Church Minutes, 24 Apr. 1839; compare JS History, vol. C-1, 929.bHancock Co., IL, Deed Records, 1817–1917, vol. 12-G, p. 247, 30 Apr. 1839, microfilm 954,195, U.S. and Canada Record Collection, FHL; Hancock Co., IL, Bonds and Mortgages, 1840–1904, vol. 1, pp. 31–32, 30 Apr. 1839, microfilm 954,776, U.S. and Canada Record Collection, FHL.cLee Co., IA, Land Records, 1836–1961, vol. 1, pp. 507–510, 29 May 1839, microfilm 959,238; vol. 2, pp. 3–6, 13–16, 26 June 1839, microfilm 959,239, U.S. and Canada Record Collection, FHL; JS History, vol. C-1, 931–932; Alanson Ripley, Statements, ca. Jan. 1845, in Historian’s Office, JS History Documents, ca. 1839–1856, CHL.)
  4. 4

    The church held the three-day conference, 4–6 May 1839, at the Presbyterian campground two miles north of Quincy.a The conference minutes, in James Mulholland’s handwriting, report that JS “addressed a few observations on the state of his own peculiar feelings, after having been so long separated from his brethren.” The conference temporarily suspended apostles Orson Hyde and William Smith from acting in their office; they regained standing by the end of June. The conference also ratified the actions of other members of the Quorum of the Twelve on 26 April 1839 at the temple site at Far West, Missouri, where they ordained new apostles to fill vacancies in their quorum and officially commenced their mission to Europe.b  

    Woodruff, Wilford. Journals, 1833–1898. Wilford Woodruff, Journals and Papers, 1828–1898. CHL. MS 1352.

    General Church Minutes, 1839–1877. CHL. CR 100 318.

    (aWoodruff, Journal, 4, 5, and 6 May 1839.bGeneral Church Minutes, 4 May 1839; JS, Journal, 25 May and 27 June 1839.)
  5. 5

    The conference this day focused on plans for obtaining legal redress for the depredations committed against the Latter-day Saints in Missouri as well as for securing their rights in Illinois. Sidney Rigdon was assigned to present the church’s case before the national government in Washington DC. Almon Babbitt was authorized to represent the church to the state government in Springfield, Illinois. Lyman Wight was appointed to gather affidavits regarding individual losses in Missouri to be forwarded to Washington. (General Church Minutes, 5 May 1839.)  

    General Church Minutes, 1839–1877. CHL. CR 100 318.

  6. 6

    TEXT: “[hole burned in paper]d”. The top of the “n” is visible at the edge of the hole.  

  7. 7

    Two sessions of the conference were held this day. At the first session, a general gathering, sixty men were ordained as elders or as members of the Quorum of the Seventy and eighteen men were assigned to accompany the Quorum of the Twelve to Europe. William Marks was appointed to preside over the church in Commerce, with the church’s bishops to assist him in leadership, which effectively established a new gathering center for the church in Illinois. Later in the day, a second session of the conference involving JS, the Twelve, and the bishops was held at the home of Bishop Edward Partridge. (Woodruff, Journal, 6 May 1839; General Church Minutes, 6 May 1839.)  

    Woodruff, Wilford. Journals, 1833–1898. Wilford Woodruff, Journals and Papers, 1828–1898. CHL. MS 1352.

    General Church Minutes, 1839–1877. CHL. CR 100 318.

  8. 8

    Although the three-day general conference ended on Monday, JS spent Tuesday in council and conversation with church leaders and members. (Kimball, “History,” 104.)  

    Kimball, Heber C. “History of Heber Chase Kimball by His Own Dictation,” ca. 1842–1856. Heber C. Kimball, Papers, 1837–1866. CHL. MS 627, box 2.

  9. 9

    JS and family left Quincy on 9 May, accompanied by James Mulholland, and arrived in Commerce on 10 May. (Mulholland, Journal, 9 May 1839; Foote, Autobiography, 9 May 1839.)  

    Mulholland, James. Journal, Apr.–Oct. 1839. In Joseph Smith, Journal, Sept.–Oct. 1838. Joseph Smith Collection. CHL. MS 155, box 1, fd. 4.

    Foote, Warren. Autobiography, not before 1903. Warren Foote, Papers, 1837–1941. CHL. MS 1123, fd. 1.

  10. 10

    At the conference held in Quincy, Illinois, a week earlier, Granger was appointed an agent for the church with a commission to oversee remaining church business in Kirtland, Ohio. (Certificate, JS et al. to Oliver Granger, Commerce, IL, 13 May 1839, in JS Letterbook 2, pp. 45–46; JS, Nauvoo, IL, to Oliver Granger, New York, [23] July 1840, in JS Letterbook 2, pp. 159–161.)  

    JS Letterbook 2 / Smith, Joseph. “Copies of Letters, &c. &c.,” 1839–1843. Joseph Smith Collection. CHL. MS 155, box 2, fd. 2.

    JS Letterbook 2 / Smith, Joseph. “Copies of Letters, &c. &c.,” 1839–1843. Joseph Smith Collection, 1827–1846. CHL. MS 155, box 2, fd. 2.

  11. 11

    James Mulholland recorded in his personal journal that his wife accompanied him on the return to Commerce, suggesting that one purpose for his visit in Quincy was to effect a permanent move to Commerce. While his scribe was away, JS remained in Commerce, busy with various matters of church business, including directing the survey of the city plot. (Mulholland, Journal, 14–19 May 1839; JS History, vol. C-1, 940; Woodruff, Journal, 18 May 1839; Historian’s Office, “History of Brigham Young,” 28.)  

    Mulholland, James. Journal, Apr.–Oct. 1839. In Joseph Smith, Journal, Sept.–Oct. 1838. Joseph Smith Collection. CHL. MS 155, box 1, fd. 4.

    JS History / Smith, Joseph, et al. History, 1838–1856. Vols. A-1–F-1 (original), A-2–E-2 (fair copy). Historian’s Office, History of the Church, 1839–ca. 1882. CHL. CR 100 102, boxes 1–7. The history for the period after 5 Aug. 1838 was composed after the death of Joseph Smith.

    Woodruff, Wilford. Journals, 1833–1898. Wilford Woodruff, Journals and Papers, 1828–1898. CHL. MS 1352.

    Historian’s Office. “History of Brigham Young.” In Manuscript History of Brigham Young, ca. 1856–1860, vol. 1, pp. 1–104. CHL. CR 100 150, box 1, fd. 1.

  12. 12

    JS wrote to William W. Phelps declining his offer to sell property in Missouri for Joseph Smith Sr. JS also wrote letters to Newel K. Whitney and others, urging them to move to Commerce. (William W. Phelps, Far West, MO, to John P. Greene, Quincy, IL, 23 Apr. 1839, in JS Letterbook 2, p. 7; JS, Commerce, IL, to William W. Phelps, Far West, MO, 22 May 1839, in JS Letterbook 2, p. 7; JS, Commerce, IL, to Newel K. Whitney, 24 May 1839, in JS Letterbook 2, p. 13; JS, Commerce, IL, to G. W. Harris, Quincy, IL, 24 May 1839, in JS Letterbook 2, pp. 11–12; JS and Emma Smith, Commerce, IL, to “Judge Cleveland and Lady,” Quincy, IL, 24 May 1839, in JS Letterbook 2, p. 12.)  

    JS Letterbook 2 / Smith, Joseph. “Copies of Letters, &c. &c.,” 1839–1843. Joseph Smith Collection, 1827–1846. CHL. MS 155, box 2, fd. 2.

  13. 13

    On 21 May, JS and other church leaders surveyed several square miles of land in Iowa across the river from Commerce. (Woodruff, Journal, 21 May 1839.)  

    Woodruff, Wilford. Journals, 1833–1898. Wilford Woodruff, Journals and Papers, 1828–1898. CHL. MS 1352.

  14. 14

    William Smith was suspended from the Quorum of the Twelve at the 4–6 May 1839 conference.a Wilford Woodruff, also a member of the quorum, recorded that the Twelve “spent the day in council with Joseph” at his home and that “Brother W m . Smith was restored to his quorum.”b The council also discussed Lyman Wight’s letters—recently published in the Quincy Whig—regarding depredations committed against the Latter-day Saints in Missouri.c  

    General Church Minutes, 1839–1877. CHL. CR 100 318.

    Woodruff, Wilford. Journals, 1833–1898. Wilford Woodruff, Journals and Papers, 1828–1898. CHL. MS 1352.

    Kimball, Heber C. “History of Heber Chase Kimball by His Own Dictation,” ca. 1842–1856. Heber C. Kimball, Papers, 1837–1866. CHL. MS 627, box 2.

    JS Letterbook 2 / Smith, Joseph. “Copies of Letters, &c. &c.,” 1839–1843. Joseph Smith Collection, 1827–1846. CHL. MS 155, box 2, fd. 2.

    Quincy Whig. Quincy, IL. 1838–1856.

    (aGeneral Church Minutes, 4 May 1839.bWoodruff, Journal, 25 May 1839; see also Kimball, “History,” 104.cJS, Commerce, IL, to Lyman Wight, Quincy, IL, 27 May 1839, in JS Letterbook 2, pp. 13–14; “Difference of Opinion,” Quincy Whig, 25 May 1839, [1]; JS et al., Commerce, IL, to Robert B. Thompson, Quincy, IL, 25 May 1839, in JS Letterbook 2, p. 11.)
  15. 15

    Wilford Woodruff’s journal clarifies that Pratt and Taylor preached in JS’s home. (Woodruff, Journal, 26 May 1839.)  

    Woodruff, Wilford. Journals, 1833–1898. Wilford Woodruff, Journals and Papers, 1828–1898. CHL. MS 1352.

  16. 16

    At Quincy, JS met with Latter-day Saints, instructed members of the Quorum of the Seventy, and prepared licenses for missionaries. On 4 June, JS dictated a lengthy list of Missouri losses. (Woodruff, Journal, following 17 June 1839; Richards, “Pocket Companion,” 63–73; Missionary certificates for Brigham Young, George A. Smith, and Wilford Woodruff, Quincy, IL, 3 June 1839, signed by Sidney Rigdon, Hyrum Smith, and JS, JS Collection, CHL; JS, “Bill of Damages against the State of Missouri on Account of the Sufferings and Losses Sustained Therein,” Quincy, IL, 4 June 1839, JS Collection, CHL; compare JS, “Extract, from the Private Journal of Joseph Smith Jr.,” Times and Seasons, Nov. 1839, 1:7.)  

    Woodruff, Wilford. Journals, 1833–1898. Wilford Woodruff, Journals and Papers, 1828–1898. CHL. MS 1352.

    Richards, Willard. “Willard Richards Pocket Companion Written in England,” ca. 1838–1840. Willard Richards, Papers, 1821–1854. CHL. MS 1490, box 2, fd. 6.

    Smith, Joseph. Collection, 1827–1846. CHL. MS 155.

    Times and Seasons. Commerce/Nauvoo, IL. Nov. 1839–Feb. 1846.

  17. 17

    TEXT: “pre[hole burned in paper]ed”.  

  18. 18

    JS began work on a new history the year before. JS and Mulholland evidently resumed work on the history at this time. (See JS, Journal, 30 Apr. 1838; 1, 2, 3, and 4 May 1838; and Mulholland, Journal, 10–13 June 1839.)  

    Mulholland, James. Journal, Apr.–Oct. 1839. In Joseph Smith, Journal, Sept.–Oct. 1838. Joseph Smith Collection. CHL. MS 155, box 1, fd. 4.

  19. 19

    James Mulholland’s handwriting appears in the surviving pages of a draft of the beginning of JS’s 1838–1856 history and in the first fifty-nine pages of the complete manuscript. Mulholland’s personal journal also records their work on the history. (JS History, 1839 [draft]; Jessee, “Writing of Joseph Smith’s History,” 441, 450, 464; JS History, vol. A-1, 1–59; Mulholland, Journal, 10–13 June 1839.)  

    JS History, 1838–ca. 1841 (draft) / Smith, Joseph. History, 1838–ca. 1841. Draft. CHL.

    Jessee, Dean C. “The Writing of Joseph Smith’s History.” BYU Studies 11 (Summer 1971): 439–473.

    JS History / Smith, Joseph, et al. History, 1838–1856. Vols. A-1–F-1 (original), A-2–E-2 (fair copy). Historian’s Office, History of the Church, 1839–ca. 1882. CHL. CR 100 102, boxes 1–7. The history for the period after 5 Aug. 1838 was composed after the death of Joseph Smith.

    Mulholland, James. Journal, Apr.–Oct. 1839. In Joseph Smith, Journal, Sept.–Oct. 1838. Joseph Smith Collection. CHL. MS 155, box 1, fd. 4.

  20. 20

    Possibly Joseph Rose. (1840 U.S. Census, Adams Co., IL, 78.)  

    Census (U.S.) / U.S. Bureau of the Census. Population Schedules. Microfilm. FHL.

  21. 21

    JS’s history has Knight returning to Quincy the same day, 17 June. (JS History, vol. C-1, 956.)  

    JS History / Smith, Joseph, et al. History, 1838–1856. Vols. A-1–F-1 (original), A-2–E-2 (fair copy). Historian’s Office, History of the Church, 1839–ca. 1882. CHL. CR 100 102, boxes 1–7. The history for the period after 5 Aug. 1838 was composed after the death of Joseph Smith.

  22. 22

    Possibly Anson Mathews. (1840 U.S. Census, Hancock Co., IL, 169; “A Record of the Names of the Members of the Church,” Nauvoo, IL, 1842, p. 21, in Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, Nauvoo 1st Ward, IL, Record of Members, 1841–1845, microfilm 889,392, U.S. and Canada Record Collection, FHL.)  

    Census (U.S.) / U.S. Bureau of the Census. Population Schedules. Microfilm. FHL.

    U.S. and Canada Record Collection. FHL.

  23. 23

    Coltrin, president of the local congregation, apparently lived in or near Macomb, McDonough County, Illinois. (Notice, Times and Seasons, Dec. 1839, 1:31.)  

    Times and Seasons. Commerce/Nauvoo, IL. Nov. 1839–Feb. 1846.

  24. 24

    Probably John Vance, who lived in or near Macomb, McDonough County, Illinois. (Notice, Times and Seasons, Dec. 1839, 1:31; Woodruff, Journal, 11–12 Aug. 1839; “Agents for the Times and Seasons,” Times and Seasons, Feb. 1840, 1:64.)  

    Times and Seasons. Commerce/Nauvoo, IL. Nov. 1839–Feb. 1846.

    Woodruff, Wilford. Journals, 1833–1898. Wilford Woodruff, Journals and Papers, 1828–1898. CHL. MS 1352.

  25. 25

    The local Latter-day Saint congregation consisted of about seventy members. (Notice, Times and Seasons, Dec. 1839, 1:31.)  

    Times and Seasons. Commerce/Nauvoo, IL. Nov. 1839–Feb. 1846.

  26. 26

    Probably Benjamin Wilcox, who lived in or near Macomb, McDonough County, Illinois. (Notice, Times and Seasons, Dec. 1839, 1:31.)  

    Times and Seasons. Commerce/Nauvoo, IL. Nov. 1839–Feb. 1846.

  27. 27

    This was the third day of a three-day conference held by the Twelve, which commenced before JS’s return to Commerce. Hyde was disaffected from the church in Missouri, where he and Thomas B. Marsh made a statement that apostle Wilford Woodruff characterized as “fals testimony against the presidency & the Church before the authorities of the State of Missouri which was a leading cause of the Governour’s calling out thirty thousand of the Militia against the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints.” Woodruff’s journal also clarifies that Hyde was restored this day to full fellowship in the Quorum of the Twelve, from which he and William Smith had been suspended in May 1839.a At the conference, JS gave instructions on faith, repentance, baptism, the gift of tongues, the resurrection, and the doctrine of election. Woodruff recorded that JS presented one of a “vast number of the Keys of the Kingdom of God” to the Twelve “for there benefit in there experience & travels.”b The conference inaugurated a series of meetings in which JS instructed the Twelve in preparation for their mission to Europe.c  

    Esplin, Ronald K. “The Emergence of Brigham Young and the Twelve to Mormon Leadership, 1830–1841.” PhD diss., Brigham Young University, 1981. Also available as The Emergence of Brigham Young and the Twelve to Mormon Leadership, 1830–1841, Dissertations in Latter-day Saint History (Provo, UT: Joseph Fielding Smith Institute for Latter-day Saint History; BYU Studies, 2006).

    Woodruff, Wilford. Journals, 1833–1898. Wilford Woodruff, Journals and Papers, 1828–1898. CHL. MS 1352.

    Richards, Willard. “Willard Richards Pocket Companion Written in England,” ca. 1838–1840. Willard Richards, Papers, 1821–1854. CHL. MS 1490, box 2, fd. 6.

    (aEsplin, “Emergence of Brigham Young,” chap. 7, esp. pp. 339–343; chap. 9, esp. p. 399; Woodruff, Journal, 25 June 1839.bRichards, “Pocket Companion,” 15–22; Woodruff, Journal, 27 June 1839.cSee Woodruff, Journal, 2 and 7 July 1839.)
  28. 28

    On 26 June, Knight, acting as a church agent, purchased land in the “Half-Breed Tract,” Lee County, Iowa, that totaled 16,281.78 acres according to the property deeds, at a cost of approximately $41,200.a Wilford Woodruff recorded that the group “rode four miles down the river to see the place called Blefens point whare the Saints expected to build a town, Joseph pronounced it good & we returned.”b “Blefens point” apparently was named after a previous landowner, “J. P. Blevins.” This land later became the Latter-day Saint settlement of Nashville, Iowa.c  

    U.S. and Canada Record Collection. FHL.

    Woodruff, Wilford. Journals, 1833–1898. Wilford Woodruff, Journals and Papers, 1828–1898. CHL. MS 1352.

    Smith, Elias. Journals, 1836–1888. CHL. MS 1319.

    The History of Lee County, Iowa, Containing a History of the County, Its Cities, Towns, &c., a Biographical Directory of Citizens. . . . Chicago: Western Historical Co., 1879.

    (aSee Lee Co., IA, Land Records, 1836–1961, vol. 2, pp. 3–6, 13–16, 26 June 1839, microfilm 959,239, U.S. and Canada Record Collection, FHL.bWoodruff, Journal, 2 July 1839; see also 27 June 1839.cWoodruff, Journal, 28 June 1839; Lee Co., IA, Land Records, 1836–1961, vol. 2, pp. 5–6, 26 June 1839; vol. 2, p. 547, 22 Jan. 1841, microfilm 959,239, U.S. and Canada Record Collection, FHL; Elias Smith, Journal, 24 and 29 June 1839; History of Lee County, 679.)
  29. 29

    This meeting was held at Brigham Young’s Montrose lodgings on the Iowa side of the river. (Woodruff, Journal, 2 July 1839.)  

    Woodruff, Wilford. Journals, 1833–1898. Wilford Woodruff, Journals and Papers, 1828–1898. CHL. MS 1352.

  30. 30

    Woodruff and Smith were ordained apostles 26 April 1839 at the temple lot in Far West, Missouri, when the Twelve symbolically commenced their mission to Europe, in accordance with revelation. (Woodruff, Journal, 26 Apr. 1839; Minutes, Far West, MO, 26 Apr. 1839, JS Letterbook 2, pp. 138–139; Revelation, 8 July 1838–A, in JS, Journal, 8 July 1838 [D&C 118].)  

    Woodruff, Wilford. Journals, 1833–1898. Wilford Woodruff, Journals and Papers, 1828–1898. CHL. MS 1352.

    Minutes, Far West, MO, 26 Apr. 1839, JS Letterbook 2, pp. 138–139

  31. 31

    The presidency laid hands on Brigham Young’s wife, Mary Ann Angell Young; John Taylor’s wife, Leonora Cannon Taylor; and Wilford Woodruff’s wife, Phebe Carter Woodruff. (Woodruff, Journal, 2 July 1839.)  

    Woodruff, Wilford. Journals, 1833–1898. Wilford Woodruff, Journals and Papers, 1828–1898. CHL. MS 1352.

  32. 32

    JS explicitly directed his comments toward the Twelve, encouraging them to cooperate and support each other while on their mission in Europe. Heber C. Kimball later reported that around this time JS also spoke of “unfolding keys of knowledge to detect Satan, and preserve us in the favor of God.” (Woodruff, Journal, 2 July 1839; Richards, “Pocket Companion,” 11; Kimball, “History,” 106.)  

    Woodruff, Wilford. Journals, 1833–1898. Wilford Woodruff, Journals and Papers, 1828–1898. CHL. MS 1352.

    Richards, Willard. “Willard Richards Pocket Companion Written in England,” ca. 1838–1840. Willard Richards, Papers, 1821–1854. CHL. MS 1490, box 2, fd. 6.

    Kimball, Heber C. “History of Heber Chase Kimball by His Own Dictation,” ca. 1842–1856. Heber C. Kimball, Papers, 1837–1866. CHL. MS 627, box 2.

  33. 33

    In April 1839, the church purchased land in the Commerce area and on the Iowa side of the Mississippi River from Galland, an early settler of the area. (Leonard, Nauvoo, 165; Cook, “Isaac Galland,” 270; Hancock Co., IL, Deed Records, 1817–1917, vol. 12-G, p. 247, 30 Apr. 1839, microfilm 954,195, U.S. and Canada Record Collection, FHL.)  

    Leonard, Glen M. Nauvoo: A Place of Peace, a People of Promise. Salt Lake City: Deseret Book; Provo, UT: Brigham Young University Press, 2002.

    Cook, Lyndon W. “Isaac Galland—Mormon Benefactor.” BYU Studies 19 (Spring 1979): 261–284.

    U.S. and Canada Record Collection. FHL.

  34. 34

    The Knight family was prominent in the Colesville, New York, branch of the church during the first year of the church’s organization. Knight presumably assisted with the history by providing information about his experiences with JS and the church in the period between April and August 1830. (JS History, vol. A-1, 37–53.)  

    JS History / Smith, Joseph, et al. History, 1838–1856. Vols. A-1–F-1 (original), A-2–E-2 (fair copy). Historian’s Office, History of the Church, 1839–ca. 1882. CHL. CR 100 102, boxes 1–7. The history for the period after 5 Aug. 1838 was composed after the death of Joseph Smith.

  35. 35

    TEXT: The second of two pages numbered “6”; page numbers remain one off through the rest of the journal.  

  36. 36

    The promises to which Page referred were apparently on pages 541 and 534 of the original 1830 edition of the Book of Mormon, not the 1837 edition. Those pages of the original edition correspond to Ether 2:4–13 and Mormon 8:26–36 in the modern edition of the Book of Mormon. Promises found on page 541 concern freedom for the “land which is choice above all other lands,” contingent on the inhabitants serving Jesus Christ. The content of page 534 focuses on conditions that would prevail when the Book of Mormon would be brought forth “out of the earth.”  

    The Book of Mormon: An Account Written by the Hand of Mormon, upon Plates Taken from the Plates of Nephi. Palmyra, NY: E. B. Grandin, 1830.

  37. 37

    Taylor, like other Latter-day Saints, believed that the “everlasting gospel” had been restored to the earth by an angel, as prophesied by John the Revelator. (See Revelation 14:6–7; and Revelation, 3 Nov. 1831, in Doctrine and Covenants 100:4, 1835 ed. [D&C 133:36–40].)  

    Doctrine and Covenants of the Church of the Latter Day Saints: Carefully Selected from the Revelations of God. Compiled by Joseph Smith, Oliver Cowdery, Sidney Rigdon, and Frederick G. Williams. Kirtland, OH: F. G. Williams, 1835. Also available in Robin Scott Jensen, Richard E. Turley Jr., Riley M. Lorimer, eds., Revelations and Translations, Volume 2: Published Revelations. Vol. 2 of the Revelations and Translations series of The Joseph Smith Papers, edited by Dean C. Jessee, Ronald K. Esplin, and Richard Lyman Bushman (Salt Lake City: Church Historian’s Press, 2011).

  38. 38

    Wilford Woodruff recorded that JS encouraged the Twelve with an allusion to his own recent imprisonment: “If you are placed whare you can ownly see your Brethren through the grates of a window while in Irons because of the gospel of Jesus Christ remember Brother Joseph has been in like circumstances also.” (Woodruff, Journal, 7 July 1839.)  

    Woodruff, Wilford. Journals, 1833–1898. Wilford Woodruff, Journals and Papers, 1828–1898. CHL. MS 1352.

  39. 39

    Pratt, Autobiography, 324.  

    Pratt, Parley P. The Autobiography of Parley Parker Pratt, One of the Twelve Apostles of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day Saints, Embracing His Life, Ministry and Travels, with Extracts, in Prose and Verse, from His Miscellaneous Writings. Edited by Parley P. Pratt Jr. New York: Russell Brothers, 1874.

  40. 40

    Tullidge, Women of Mormondom, 213–214; see also Huntington, Diary, 1.  

    Tullidge, Edward W. The Women of Mormondom. New York: Tullidge and Crandall, 1877.

    Huntington, Oliver B. Diary and Reminiscences, 1843–1900. Typescript. CHL. MS 1648.

  41. 41

    Woodruff, Journal, 12 and 19 July 1839; “The Memoirs of President Joseph Smith,” Saints’ Herald, 20 Nov. 1934, 1479.  

    Woodruff, Wilford. Journals, 1833–1898. Wilford Woodruff, Journals and Papers, 1828–1898. CHL. MS 1352.

    Saints’ Herald. Independence, MO. 1860–.

  42. 42

    Historian’s Office, “History of Brigham Young,” 34; see also Mace, Autobiography, 31.  

    Historian’s Office. “History of Brigham Young.” In Manuscript History of Brigham Young, ca. 1856–1860, vol. 1, pp. 1–104. CHL. CR 100 150, box 1, fd. 1.

    Mace, Wandle. Autobiography, ca. 1890. CHL. MS 1924.

  43. 43

    Brigham Young and others of the Twelve later took this selection of hymns on their mission to the British Isles, and it provided a basis for the new collection of hymns they published there in 1840. (A Collection of Sacred Hymns, for the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, in Europe, ed. Brigham Young, Parley P. Pratt, and John Taylor [Manchester, England: W. R. Thomas, 1840]; Crawley, Descriptive Bibliography, 121–124; Hicks, Mormonism and Music, chap. 2.)  

    Crawley, Peter. A Descriptive Bibliography of the Mormon Church. 3 vols. Provo, UT: Religious Studies Center, Brigham Young University, 1997–2012.

    Hicks, Michael. Mormonism and Music: A History. Urbana: University of Illinois Press, 1989.

  44. 44

    JS called on a number of men to bless the sick—among them his brother Don Carlos Smith, his cousin George A. Smith, and apostles John Taylor and Wilford Woodruff. (Woodruff, Journal, 12 July 1839; Benjamin F. Johnson to George F. Gibbs, Salt Lake City, UT, 1903, 8–9, Benjamin Franklin Johnson, Papers, CHL.)  

    Woodruff, Wilford. Journals, 1833–1898. Wilford Woodruff, Journals and Papers, 1828–1898. CHL. MS 1352.

    Johnson, Benjamin Franklin. Papers, 1852–1911. CHL. MS 1289, box 2, fd. 1.

  45. 45

    Brigham Young’s later history stated that on 22 July, “Joseph arose from his bed of sickness and the power of God rested upon him he commenced in his own house and dooryard, commanding the sick in the name of Jesus Christ to arise and be made whole, and they were healed according to his word; he then continued to travel from house to house, and from tent to tent upon the bank of the river, healing the sick as he went.” The history further reported that JS crossed the Mississippi and healed a number of Iowa Saints, including Young himself. (Historian’s Office, “History of Brigham Young,” 34–35.)  

    Historian’s Office. “History of Brigham Young.” In Manuscript History of Brigham Young, ca. 1856–1860, vol. 1, pp. 1–104. CHL. CR 100 150, box 1, fd. 1.

  46. 46

    Pratt, one of the last two to escape from prison in Missouri, had just recently rejoined the Latter-day Saints in Commerce. (Parley P. Pratt, Commerce, IL, to Aaron Frost, Bethel, ME, 21 July 1839, Parley P. Pratt, Letters, 1838–1839, CHL; Pratt, Autobiography, chaps. 22–23, 32–33, 36.)  

    Pratt, Parley P. Letters, 1838–1839. CHL. MS 5828.

    Pratt, Parley P. The Autobiography of Parley Parker Pratt, One of the Twelve Apostles of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day Saints, Embracing His Life, Ministry and Travels, with Extracts, in Prose and Verse, from His Miscellaneous Writings. Edited by Parley P. Pratt Jr. New York: Russell Brothers, 1874.

  47. 47

    To purify oneself from within. (See Matthew 23:25–26; and Luke 11:39.)  

  48. 48

    Wilford Woodruff characterized this as a “meeting of Prayer & fasting.” (Woodruff, Journal, 4 Aug. 1839.)  

    Woodruff, Wilford. Journals, 1833–1898. Wilford Woodruff, Journals and Papers, 1828–1898. CHL. MS 1352.

  49. 49

    Heber C. Kimball reported JS’s instruction to travel without purse or scrip “according to the revelations of Jesus Christ.” Latter-day Saint missionaries commonly followed the pattern established by the ministry of Jesus’s disciples to “carry neither purse, nor scrip”—money bag or traveling bag—meaning to depend on the hospitality and assistance of others. (Kimball, “History,” 111; Mark 6:8; Luke 10:4; Revelation, July 1830–A, in Doctrine and Covenants 9:7, 1835 ed. [D&C 24:18]; Revelation, 22–23 Sept. 1832, in Doctrine and Covenants 4:13, 1835 ed. [D&C 84:77–78].)  

    Kimball, Heber C. “History of Heber Chase Kimball by His Own Dictation,” ca. 1842–1856. Heber C. Kimball, Papers, 1837–1866. CHL. MS 627, box 2.

    Doctrine and Covenants of the Church of the Latter Day Saints: Carefully Selected from the Revelations of God. Compiled by Joseph Smith, Oliver Cowdery, Sidney Rigdon, and Frederick G. Williams. Kirtland, OH: F. G. Williams, 1835. Also available in Robin Scott Jensen, Richard E. Turley Jr., Riley M. Lorimer, eds., Revelations and Translations, Volume 2: Published Revelations. Vol. 2 of the Revelations and Translations series of The Joseph Smith Papers, edited by Dean C. Jessee, Ronald K. Esplin, and Richard Lyman Bushman (Salt Lake City: Church Historian’s Press, 2011).

  50. 50

    Sickness and poverty delayed and staggered the departure of the Twelve. Wilford Woodruff and John Taylor departed during the week following this Sunday gathering, but others did not leave until later in the fall. (Woodruff, Journal, 25 July 1839; 7 and 8 Aug. 1839; Historian’s Office, “History of Brigham Young,” 35; Allen et al., Men with a Mission, chap. 4.)  

    Woodruff, Wilford. Journals, 1833–1898. Wilford Woodruff, Journals and Papers, 1828–1898. CHL. MS 1352.

    Historian’s Office. “History of Brigham Young.” In Manuscript History of Brigham Young, ca. 1856–1860, vol. 1, pp. 1–104. CHL. CR 100 150, box 1, fd. 1.

    Allen, James B., Ronald K. Esplin, and David J. Whittaker. Men with a Mission, 1837–1841: The Quorum of the Twelve Apostles in the British Isles. Salt Lake City: Deseret Book, 1992.

  51. 51

    In the wake of the recent expulsion from Missouri, the impoverished church had difficulty keeping the agreement to provide for the families of the traveling apostles. A few months after the departure of the Twelve, Hyrum Smith wrote to Parley P. Pratt with considerable understatement, “The families of the Twelve are generally well, but not altogether so comfortably situated as I could wish owing to the poverty of the Church.” (Hyrum Smith, Nauvoo, IL, to Parley P. Pratt, New York City, NY, 22 Dec. 1839, in JS Letterbook 2, pp. 80–81; see also Allen et al., Men with a Mission, chap. 11.)  

    JS Letterbook 2 / Smith, Joseph. “Copies of Letters, &c. &c.,” 1839–1843. Joseph Smith Collection, 1827–1846. CHL. MS 155, box 2, fd. 2.

    Allen, James B., Ronald K. Esplin, and David J. Whittaker. Men with a Mission, 1837–1841: The Quorum of the Twelve Apostles in the British Isles. Salt Lake City: Deseret Book, 1992.

  52. 52

    Probably Davidson and Sarah Tilton Hibbard with their children William and Melvina. (Gregg, History of Hancock County, 221, 964; JS History, vol. C-1, 972; “The Memoirs of President Joseph Smith,” Saints’ Herald, 13 Nov. 1934, 1454; 1830 U.S. Census, Hancock Co., IL, 286; 1840 U.S. Census, Hancock Co., IL, 185; 1850 U.S. Census, Hancock Co., IL, 405[B]; 1880 U.S. Census, Nauvoo, Hancock Co., IL, 191B; Hancock Co., IL, Marriage Register, 1829–1915, vol. A-1, p. 100, microfilm 954,177, U.S. and Canada Record Collection, FHL.)  

    Gregg, Thomas. History of Hancock County, Illinois, Together with an Outline History of the State, and a Digest of State Laws. Chicago: Charles C. Chapman, 1880.

    JS History / Smith, Joseph, et al. History, 1838–1856. Vols. A-1–F-1 (original), A-2–E-2 (fair copy). Historian’s Office, History of the Church, 1839–ca. 1882. CHL. CR 100 102, boxes 1–7. The history for the period after 5 Aug. 1838 was composed after the death of Joseph Smith.

    Saints’ Herald. Independence, MO. 1860–.

    Census (U.S.) / U.S. Bureau of the Census. Population Schedules. Microfilm. FHL.

    U.S. and Canada Record Collection. FHL.

  53. 53

    A number of Latter-day Saints still resided in Kirtland. The conference held 4–6 May 1839 at Quincy, Illinois, resolved to advise Latter-day Saints living in the eastern states to gather to Kirtland if they did not want to travel as far as Commerce. (Turley, Journal, 11–14; Far West Committee, Minutes, 4 May 1839.)  

    Turley, Theodore. Reminiscences and Journal, Sept. 1839–July 1840. Photocopy. CHL. MS 1950.

    Far West Committee. Minutes, Jan.–Apr. 1839. CHL. MS 2564.

  54. 54

    On 12 August 1839, the previous week, William White sold the church eighty acres adjoining Commerce, north of the land obtained from Hugh White that May. (Leonard, Nauvoo, 54–59.)  

    Leonard, Glen M. Nauvoo: A Place of Peace, a People of Promise. Salt Lake City: Deseret Book; Provo, UT: Brigham Young University Press, 2002.

  55. 55

    These “errors” probably included some of the doctrinal positions in Parley P. Pratt, A Voice of Warning and Instruction to All People, Containing a Declaration of the Faith and Doctrine of the Church of the Latter Day Saints, Commonly Called Mormons (New York: W. Sandford, 1837), of which the second edition (1839) contains several substantial revisions. (See Crawley, Descriptive Bibliography, 97–98.)  

    Crawley, Peter. A Descriptive Bibliography of the Mormon Church. 3 vols. Provo, UT: Religious Studies Center, Brigham Young University, 1997–2012.

  56. 56

    TEXT: The remainder of the entry is written in lighter ink.  

  57. 57

    The land purchased by the church the prior month for Latter-day Saint settlement. The newly platted land, adjoined to but distinct from Commerce, was soon named Nauvoo and was eventually reorganized to subsume Commerce. (JS, Journal, 18–24 Aug. 1839; Leonard, Nauvoo, 54–59.)  

    Leonard, Glen M. Nauvoo: A Place of Peace, a People of Promise. Salt Lake City: Deseret Book; Provo, UT: Brigham Young University Press, 2002.

  58. 58

    At Plymouth, Illinois. (JS, Journal, 15–17 June 1839.)  

  59. 59

    JS and his counselors in the presidency sold lots this week from the land the church had earlier purchased for Latter-day Saint settlement. (See, for example, Deed, JS et al. to Randolph Alexander, Nauvoo, IL, 18 Sept. 1839, Newel K. Whitney, Papers, BYU; and Deed, JS et al. to Moses Nickerson, Nauvoo, IL, 18 Sept. 1839, JS Collection, CHL.)  

    Whitney, Newel K. Papers, 1825–1906. BYU.

    Smith, Joseph. Collection, 1827–1846. CHL. MS 155.

  60. 60

    JS’s later history has him traveling to Burlington, but the history may mistakenly assume he is the referent of the statement in this journal that James Mulholland was keeping for him. Mulholland’s personal journal of the same period indicates that Mulholland, at least, did travel to Burlington, whether JS did or not. (JS History, vol. C-1, 967; Mulholland, Journal, 19 Sept. 1839.)  

    JS History / Smith, Joseph, et al. History, 1838–1856. Vols. A-1–F-1 (original), A-2–E-2 (fair copy). Historian’s Office, History of the Church, 1839–ca. 1882. CHL. CR 100 102, boxes 1–7. The history for the period after 5 Aug. 1838 was composed after the death of Joseph Smith.

    Mulholland, James. Journal, Apr.–Oct. 1839. In Joseph Smith, Journal, Sept.–Oct. 1838. Joseph Smith Collection. CHL. MS 155, box 1, fd. 4.

  61. 61

    Expounding John 14:16–17, 26. JS’s history for this date, prepared under the direction of Willard Richards, adds the phrase “as I had previously taught the Twelve”—apparently referring to JS’s 27 June 1839 instructions to the Twelve regarding the doctrine of election.a Whereas the New Testament identifies the Comforter as the Holy Ghost, JS equated the “other” Comforter with having one’s “calling & Election made sure.” Willard Richards recorded that JS clarified that the “other Comforter” is Jesus Christ and that “when any man obtains this last Comforter he will have the personage of Jesus Christ to attend him or appear unto him from time to time. & even he will manifest the Father unto him & they will take up their abode with him, & the visions of the heavens will be opened unto him & the Lord will teach him face to face & he may have a perfect knowledge of the mysteries of the kingdom of God.” JS explained that a person was worthy to receive the other Comforter “when the Lord has thorougly proved him & finds that the man is determined to serve him at all hazard.”b  

    JS History / Smith, Joseph, et al. History, 1838–1856. Vols. A-1–F-1 (original), A-2–E-2 (fair copy). Historian’s Office, History of the Church, 1839–ca. 1882. CHL. CR 100 102, boxes 1–7. The history for the period after 5 Aug. 1838 was composed after the death of Joseph Smith.

    Richards, Willard. “Willard Richards Pocket Companion Written in England,” ca. 1838–1840. Willard Richards, Papers, 1821–1854. CHL. MS 1490, box 2, fd. 6.

    (aJS History, vol. C-1, 967.bRichards, “Pocket Companion,” 19–21.)
  62. 62

    See 1 Thessalonians 4:16–17.  

  63. 63

    An August 1831 apocalyptic revelation stated that “the saints also shall hardly escape.” (Revelation, 30 Aug. 1831, in Doctrine and Covenants 20:9, 1835 ed. [D&C 63:34].)  

    Doctrine and Covenants of the Church of the Latter Day Saints: Carefully Selected from the Revelations of God. Compiled by Joseph Smith, Oliver Cowdery, Sidney Rigdon, and Frederick G. Williams. Kirtland, OH: F. G. Williams, 1835. Also available in Robin Scott Jensen, Richard E. Turley Jr., Riley M. Lorimer, eds., Revelations and Translations, Volume 2: Published Revelations. Vol. 2 of the Revelations and Translations series of The Joseph Smith Papers, edited by Dean C. Jessee, Ronald K. Esplin, and Richard Lyman Bushman (Salt Lake City: Church Historian’s Press, 2011).

  64. 64

    See Romans 1:17; Galatians 3:11; and Hebrews 10:38.  

  65. 65

    Over a dozen Latter-day Saints living in and along the Mississippi River valley had died over the summer, including infants and children, JS’s uncle Silas Smith, and family members of close friends. (Obituary for Silas Smith, Times and Seasons, Dec. 1839, 1:32; see various obituaries in Times and Seasons, Dec. 1839–Oct. 1840; see also Tullidge, Women of Mormondom, 213–214.)  

    Times and Seasons. Commerce/Nauvoo, IL. Nov. 1839–Feb. 1846.

    Tullidge, Edward W. The Women of Mormondom. New York: Tullidge and Crandall, 1877.

  66. 66

    See Matthew 7:1; and Luke 6:37.  

  67. 67

    The conference continued into Monday, 7 October 1839. (Minutes, Times and Seasons, Dec. 1839, 1:30–31.)  

    Times and Seasons. Commerce/Nauvoo, IL. Nov. 1839–Feb. 1846.

  68. 68

    The church newspaper reported that JS “spoke at some length upon the situation of the Church, the difficulties they had had to contend with, and the manner in which they had been led to this place; and wished to know the views of the brethren whether they wished to appoint this a stake or not, stating that he believed it to be a good place and suited for the saints.”a The conference organized a stake in Commerce and a branch of the church across the river in Iowa Territory. JS had decided to join Sidney Rigdon on a previously announced mission to Washington DC to attempt to obtain redress for the injustices suffered by the Latter-day Saints in Missouri, and the conference appointed Judge Elias Higbee to accompany them. JS delivered several addresses, including an admonition to elders to preach with the Holy Ghost and avoid speculative teaching.b  

    Times and Seasons. Commerce/Nauvoo, IL. Nov. 1839–Feb. 1846.

    Minutes, Commerce, IL, 5 Oct. 1839, JS Letterbook 2, pp. 164–167

    (aMinutes, Times and Seasons, Dec. 1839, 1:30–31.bMinutes, Commerce, IL, 5 Oct. 1839, JS Letterbook 2, pp. 164–167.)