Letter from Calvin A. Warren, 31 August 1841

  • Source Note
  • Historical Introduction

Document Transcript

Aug. 31. 1841
To Revd. Mr. Joseph Smith;
Dear Sir; Agreeably to promise I called on Mr. Morris of in relation to his house of which I have informed your brother the bearer hereof. His asking price has been $3000. for House improvements & the seven acres of Land on which they stand— He has promised me to convey it for $2250.00 in payments as follows;
to wit;— Cash in hand $500.00
" Assumption of his debt to School Comr Marsh 700.00 750.00
" to for debt due on his Lot 150.00
1400.00
" Payable next April 850.00
$2250.00
Your Brother will examine it— & think it a good bargain—
& wish to borrow $500 at twelve per cent till spring for emergencies— We are incouraged to believe that sum might be had on good security in your — We offer ourselves and General [Samuel] Leech and as many more as may be thought to give security additional strength— Can you assist by giving a recommendation for the proposed Loan & security?—
Very Respectfully &c—
P.S. I hope to hear that the new is rising rapidly and must go ahead—
[p. [1]]
 
Memo for Mr. Smith [p. [2]]

Footnotes

  1. 1

    No available deeds indicate that either Isaac N. Morris or Benjamin F. Morris sold property for this amount in 1841 or 1842.  

  2. 2

    Benjamin F. Marsh was the school commissioner of Hancock County. As commissioner, Marsh acquired properties in behalf of the county schools. In March 1840, Isaac N. Morris owed Marsh approximately $800. (Hancock Co., IL, Deed Records, 1817–1917, vol. H, pp. 217–218, 5 Mar. 1840, microfilm 954,598, U.S. and Canada Record Collection, FHL.)  

    U.S. and Canada Record Collection. FHL.

  3. 3

    Mark Aldrich was a Warsaw businessman and real estate proprietor. (Gregg, History of Hancock County, Illinois, 637–638, 654; Hancock Co., IL, Deed Records, 1817–1917, vol. 10E, pp. 140–141, microfilm 954,194, U.S. and Canada Record Collection, FHL.)  

    Gregg, Thomas. History of Hancock County, Illinois, Together with an Outline History of the State, and a Digest of State Laws. Chicago: Charles C. Chapman, 1880.

    U.S. and Canada Record Collection. FHL.

  4. 4

    “Your Brother” likely referred to Hyrum Smith, who was in the area and involved in land transactions for the church in 1841. (Authorization for Hyrum Smith and Isaac Galland, 15 Feb. 1841; JS History, vol. C-1, addenda, 10–11.)  

  5. 5

    Aldrich and Warren were partners in previous land deals, including the purchase of the Warsaw school section in August 1836. (Hancock Co., IL, Deed Records, 1817–1917, vol. 11F, pp. 270–272, 30 Aug. 1838, microfilm 954,194, U.S. and Canada Record Collection, FHL; Gregg, History of Hancock County, Illinois, 637–638.)  

    U.S. and Canada Record Collection. FHL.

    Gregg, Thomas. History of Hancock County, Illinois, Together with an Outline History of the State, and a Digest of State Laws. Chicago: Charles C. Chapman, 1880.

  6. 6

    James H. Ralston was a member of the Illinois state senate. In January 1841 the First Presidency praised Ralston and others for the assistance that they rendered to the Saints in Quincy in 1839, and in June 1841, Ralston helped defend JS in court. Like Warren, Ralston was a resident of Quincy but was involved in Hancock County real estate. (Palmer, Bench and Bar of Illinois, 2:875; Proclamation, 15 Jan. 1841; JS History, vol. C-1, 1205; Hancock Co., IL, Deed Records, 1817–1917, vol. I, pp. 417–418, 12 Aug. 1841, microfilm 954,598, U.S. and Canada Record Collection, FHL.)  

    Palmer, John M., ed. The Bench and Bar of Illinois. 2 vols. Chicago: Lewis Publishing, 1899.

    U.S. and Canada Record Collection. FHL.

  7. 7

    Samuel Leech (Leach) was a Quincy resident and veteran of the Black Hawk War; he was evidently commissioned a general by April 1832. In March 1837 he moved to Quincy, where he took charge of the Federal Land Office. In 1839 he was instrumental in organizing the city’s relief efforts for the Saints. (History of Wayne and Clay Counties, Illinois, 48, 56, 66, 76–77; “Jackson and Johnson Convention,” Sangamo Journal [Springfield, IL], 5 Apr. 1832, [2]; News Item, Sangamo Journal, 4 Mar. 1837, [3]; “A Land-Office-Ridden State,” Sangamo Journal, 26 May 1838, [2]; Greene, Facts Relative to the Expulsion, iii, 6.)  

    History of Wayne and Clay Counties, Illinois. Chicago: Globe Publishing, 1884.

    Sangamo Journal. Springfield, IL. 1831–1847.

    Greene, John P. Facts Relative to the Expulsion of the Mormons or Latter Day Saints, from the State of Missouri, under the “Exterminating Order.” By John P. Greene, an Authorized Representative of the Mormons. Cincinnati: R. P. Brooks, 1839.