Minutes, 28–29 August 1834

  • Source Note
  • Historical Introduction

Document Transcript

Ohio August 28th 1834
This day the of the assembled according to direction of of this church to try brother who has been charged with a misdemeanor. complainent
The following is a copy of the complaint.
To , bishop of the church of the Latter Day Saints in , Sir, I prefer the following charges against , a of said Church.
First, He has refused to submit to the decision of a council of the high priests and of this church held in this place on the eleventh of this month given in a case of difficulty, between said and Joseph Smith Junr.
Second: He continues to charge said Joseph, contrary to the decision of the before mentioned council with improper conduct in his proceedings as of the church of the Latter-Day, Saints during his journey the past season, to the state of . As these things are exceedingly grievous to many of the Saints in , and very prejudicial to the cause of truth in general, I therefore require that you summon the high council of this church, to investigate this case that a final may be had upon the same. I say the high council, because it is a case [p. 58]
affecting the .
Ohio August 23d 1834
August 27th 1834
Brother ,
Whereas complaint has been made to me by brother , seting forth that you have been guilty of violating the laws of the , you are, therefore hereby notified to appear before the of , to be held in the council-house in on the 28th. day of August Instr. at 10. o clock A.M. to answer to said charge agreeable to the law of the church.
,
Ohio August 28th. 1834
This day the high council of the church of the Latter-Day Saints assembled according to direction of bishop of this church, to try brother , who has been charged with a misdemeanor. complainant. The names of the counsellors were then called and it was found that four were absent. The opened by prayer. The , brothers J. Smith Jnr. & , then proceeded to make a nomination of a high Priest to fill the vacancy in this council occasioned by the death of our beloved brother . Brother Joseph Smith Junr. then nominated brother , and brother seconded [p. 59] the nomination. A. vote was called and carried. Brother Joseph then called upon to come forward & receive the of high counsellor. After making a few remarks. he came forward, & brother then called upon the Lord in prayer, and then ordained to the said office. Brother then said he wished to be excused from sitting on this , because he had been previously tempted on some matters, and that he had sinned and wished to make a more public confession than he could make here. After some remarks from the counsellors, it was decided that continue in his seat in the council. Brother was appointed to act in the place of , brother Amos Durfee in the place of Sylvester and in the place of . The counsellors were then arranged and the charge read to the council. It was agreed that six counsellors speak on the case before the council The then gave the council their charge in the name of the Lord to act according to truth and righteousness.
Brother testified that the testimony given before a council on the 11th. Inst. was that brother J. Smith Junr. had conducted himself in a proper manner, while journeying to and from ; and that the council considered that had accused brother Joseph, wrongfully and was entirely in the fault. He further considered, that every thing bearing or relating to this affair was had before the council and from this they gave their decision. Brother concurred in the foregoing statement, and he supposed that saw the affair in the same light on the 11th inst. in consequence of his saying that he () said at the time, that he was not previously aware of the spirit that possessed him, at the time when he made his charges against brother Joseph. Brother said that he considered that the evidence given before the council on the 11th. was [p. 60] sufficient to prove that brother Joseph had conducted himself in an honorable manner, during his late journey to and from , and that he considered that the evidence there given, was such that it could not be invalidated. Brother said that previous to the on the 11th. his mind had been agitated, and it was in consequence in part, of reports which had been put in circulation respecting brother Joseph’s conduct on his late journey to and from . But when he heard the case investigated before that council his mind was satisfied that he had been misinformed, and was fully satisfied that brother Joseph had not acted in any respect, contrary to righteousness before the Lord. Brother , said that previous to the council, his mind had been agitated also, but was satisfied at the council, and he verily believed from the evidences there given, that brother J. had not acted contrary to justice. Brother said that his mind was excited still further, after conversing with previous to the 11th which served in any degree to excite his mind further. Brother said that he understood the case on the 11th. in the same light as stated by brethren & . Brethren, , and viewed the case in the same light. Brother said that he considered that was to send a confession in the Star, that he himself, had been in the fault. and that brother Joseph had not committed fault as he () had previously stated. Brethren, , , [,] , , & , concurred. Brother said, that after listening to all the reports and evidences from the beginning up to the decision on the 11th. Inst. he considered that was to acknowledge that all the charges previously preferred in public against brother J. were ungrounded, and that he, () was to acknowledge the one, and the only one in the fault, touching all circumstances, transpiring [p. 61] between himself and brother Joseph, and that the other charges indirectly preferred as grievances of others, were also without a foundation. Brother concurred in the above. Brother C. Durfee, said that he considered that brother J. was acquitted, as being guilty of any misdemeanor before the on the 11th. Brother said that he accompanied brother Joseph to , from in this State, except leaving him for a short time to visit the of . He was present when brother [JS] reproved , concerning a certain difficulty, arising from a complaint, concerning a certain dog.— That he considered brother Josephs reproofs were just at the time, as <​he​> well recollects stating the same in substance to . He did not consider this reproof had any tendency to lessen the esteem of the brethren for , but if they had, in consequence of a confession in general terms, from , about that time, he thought that sufficient to heal every hard feeling then existing against him, or that might exist. He further said, that during his journey to the West, he could not say that he had seen any thing in brother Joseph’s conduct, contrary to the true principles of his profession as a man of God. Brother said that he fell in company with brother J. at Ohio, and accompanied him the most of the way to , and that during the whole course of the journey, he did not see any thing in his conduct to lessen his esteem of him as a man of God. But he said he heard brother Joseph reprove concerning a certain something, respecting some bread, he did not hear the whole, and thought at the time the reproofs were rather severe, but had learned since, they were not any more severe than were just. Brother Joseph was then called upon to make a statement, concerning the transactions as they trans [p. 62]pired at the time these reproofs were given. He said that brother , came to him to know whether , had conducted right in the affair between him and brother , when called upon for some bread for supper. He learned from ’s mouth that had more bread than he needed at the time, and directed him to some else who, he () said had a sufficient. He then went with brethren & to ’s tent where , justified himself, in not imparting a part of his bread to . He then rebuked , for contending that he had done right in this case because if this was so, brethren might frequently retire to rest, without food, and as long as he () had bread he had was bound. to impart to those who had none, and that under these circumstances, , had conducted contrary to the principles of Christ, and that his (’s) mind was darkned in consequence of this covetous spirit.
The then adjourned the to 9. o clock tomorrow at this place. Closed in prayer by brother
) Clerks.
)
August 29th. 1834
Council being organized in due form, the testimony was continued, as follows, Brother said in relation to a circumstance that transpired on the twenty five mile prairie, so called in . that by a direction from the leader of the camp he had been back to inspect the crossing at a certain creek, that when he came up with the camp he found it moving, and as he was behind, he went on till he came up with s, & company, and found them out of the road building a fire to cook supper, As the teams passed on called to the leaders of companies. (those who were yet behind) and asked them [p. 63] who they were following? whether or some other man? Some hesitated for a little and went on. After taking supper he () went on with their company. Whe[n] he came up with the camp from the creek, he found that the ensign or flag, commonly carried ahead for the camp to follow, was then moving forward. He further said that he understood that brother Joseph was appointed to lead the camp, that he always or generally, gave orders when the camp should move forward, and when it should stop. that when on his way to the creek, the second time, he met brother Joseph, who told him that he, () should order the camp to move into the prairie. When the camp came to order in the prairie in the evening, brethren, & , were called upon to give an account of themselves, why they had sought to divide the camp? They both acknowledged that they had been out of the way by so doing and were reproved for their conduct. Relative to an assertion heretofore made, that brother Joseph, did at the time, throw a trumpet or horn at , he did not consider at the time that brother Joseph had any intentions [of throwing?] it at , because he might have hit him with it being so near to him as he was, it only fell to the ground near to them, (him & ) but supposed that he had had it in his hand and only threw it down as usual, or as another man would. He further said that the reproofs given by brother Joseph at the time, were no more severe than he had often heard him give previously. That he did not consider him mad as has been represented. Brother said that when the camp first came to the creek himself and brother Joseph were forward, that while [p. 64] the teams were crossing, brother Joseph asked whether it was advisable to move into the prairie to camp. After consultation, it was first advised to move camp in the bushes near the edge of the prairie. While making preparations to encamp, they were informed that a mob intended to make an attack upon them that night. They further consulted upon their situation and himself and , were requested, by brother Joseph, to go on to the edge of the Prairie where they might encamp. They looked out a place but it was near the bushes, and brother Joseph gave an order to go forward into the prairie. Some complained of the order because they could not find fuel to cook their supper: They were told that it would be advisable to carry wood for that purpose. Some farther remarks were offered on the subject of a visit from a mob, and preparations were made with the guns &c. Some fears were entertained for the teams and families yet crossing the creek, and it was thought advisable to send back a company to guard & assist them over, among whom was brother . He then took the flag or standard (as he had previously carried it) and gave the word to move forward, and the teams, immediately began to follow. After the company had come up in the Prairie, himself with brother , received an order to call on upon brother , to place a strong guard around the camp that night, but he refused doing any thing further, because he supposed that he, () supposed he had ordered the camp into the prairie without an order from the commander of the company. He was then informed by brother Joseph’s order <​that it was​> by his (brother J’s) order) that the camp should move into the prairie. He was present when brother Joseph reproved brothers, & [p. 65] and saw the transactions concerning the trumpet or horn and as to brother Joseph’s intention or design to throw it at , he had no such thought at the time, nor could he have since.— that at the time when he (brother Joseph) had finished his remarks to brothers & , that he threw the horn upon the ground. That told him that the next day that he had had a jealousy exisiting in his mind against him, () for some days, but now his mind was satisfied, and he had now no hardness or jealousy. He further said, that when he received the order for moving the camp into the prairie, that brothers & were near by.
The then adjourned to 1. o clock P. M.
) Clerk
)
One o clock P. M.}
met according to adjournment. The Clerk called the names of the moderators, counsellors, complainant & defendent when business was resumed.
Brother , said that he was in company with brother Joseph from about 27 miles from this place, till they arrived in Missouri. That at the time the difficulty occurred on the prairie, when the camp was divided, that he concurred in what had said, and that he could not relate it any more particular than he () had done. He further said that he had not seen any thing in brother Joseph’s conduct, to justify the charge previously made by , that his heart was corrupt. So far from this, he had not seen the least shadow of any thing of the kind. He had not seen any thing in his (brother Joseph’s) conduct, during his journey to the West unbecoming his [p. 66] profession as a man of God. Question by . Did you not think that my character was injured in the minds of the weaker part of the camp, in consequence of those reproffs and chastisements which were given me by brother Joseph? Answer. I did not. further said, in relation to a certain difficulty which took place relative to a dog,— that on a certain evening after crossing the , came up with the remaining part of the camp, when the dog came out and insulted him. he knew not whether he touched him or not. The next morning after hearing considerable complaint and murmuring concerning the dog. Brother Joseph spake to several brethren present and said, I will descend to the spirit that is in the camp, to show you the spirit you are of for I want to drive it from the camp. “The first man that kills that dog, (or my dog) I will whip him!” He thought about this time, that came up, who said “If that dog bites me I will kill him.” If you do said brother Joseph “I will whip you” If you do said , I shall defend myself the best way that I can! Brother Joseph then said that he could in the name of the Lord. He, (brother Joseph) asked the brethren if they were not ashamed of such a spirit? Said he, I am. He then proceeded to reprove them for condescending to that spirit,— that they ought to be above it, that it was the spirit of a dog, and men ought never to place themselves on a level with beasts. but be possessed of a more noble disposition. He then said he had decended to that spirit in order to show the spirit which was among them. He further said that this explanation gave general satisfaction, and the most of them saw that he had only made these remarks for the purpose of instructing them, and warning them against such a spirit or disposition. Brethern & concurred. Brother said he was not present when these reproofs were given in the mor [p. 67]ning, that the circumstances were related to him afterward, which disaffected his mind and gave him some disagreeable feelings, that at noon. he heard brother Joseph give a further explanation, which perfectly satisfied his mind. He further said that during the forenoon he learned that there <​were​> many of the bretheren dissatisfied with brother Joseph’s remarks, concerning the dog in the morning, that after the explanation at noon was so generally given, he thought that every one in the Camp might have known it. Brother concurred in the statement of brother ; though he was not present in the morning when the reproofs were given concerning the dog, that he was with brother Joseph twenty seven miles from this place to and a part of the way home.— That he did not see any thing in brother Joseph’s character derogatory to a man professing Religion.— That he was present during a certain transaction, which occurred during their journey home, respecting certain articles of beading [bedding]. That he had had heard since his return, that brother Joseph Smith Junr., and had fought, that he was present during the whole transaction, and that there was no fighting. He further said in relation to a certain report which had come to his knowledge, since his return from , that brother Joseph had taken a bed-quilt which was not his property. That while at Ohio, on their way to , one of the brethren gave him (brother Joseph) two bed-quilts, which he () had charge of as he was the individual who drove the team for brother Joseph and had charge of the baggage— That before leaving Missouri he () took them to be washed, and after starting for home, he went and put them aboard of the Waggon, the baggage of which he [p. 68] had the charge during their journey home. That he brought the same back with him,— has seen them since and knows that the one which was said to be the property of another individual, is the one which was given brother Joseph at . Brother , said while at , certain articles were handed him to mark, among which were two bed-quilts, which he marked with common ink. Has seen certain bed-quilts since his return, and has no doubt but this one in question, is the one he marked. Brother further said, relative to a certain difficulty arising out of a circumstanc concerning some bread— That brother on their journey to on the line between and said to brother Joseph is this thing right? “What thing”? concerning brother ’s asking for some bread for supper. He then learned that had asked for some bread, that had bread at the time, but directed him to some one else, who he () said had a sufficient. that called upon that individual and could not obtain any: That he was present when brother Joseph, told that he had not conducted right in the matter— that he ought to impart when he had in preference to directing one where he was not certain he could obtain— that by so doing some might be deprived of food at times. He further said that contended he had been right and justified his own conduct in the matter. That brother Joseph reasoned with to convince him, that he was in a fault, but he continued to justify his course till brother J. reproved him sharply.— He frequently heard the brethren speak of this circumstance, and all (whom he heard say any thing on the subject) manifested a satisfaction with brother J. and thought his [p. 69] observations correct, and the principles which he advanced to be just. Brother said, that he concurred in brother ’s statement concerning the bread. That he thought that it was generally known that , in consequence of s <​not​> furnishing him with bread, was deprived of bread that night.— That at the time when <​he​> brother Joseph told him that did not obtain any bread in consequence of the same. Brother said that since the Brethren’s return from the West, that he went with to brother to advise concerning the adjusting of certain complaints which were in circulation concerning brother Joseph’s conduct to and from that told that did obtain bread of the individual to whom he sent him. Brother said that he concurred in the statements of brother concerning the circumstances which transpired at the time the difficulty arose about the bread. Brethren & concurred in the same statement. Brother then exhibited an account current, taken from the receipts of money’s and other properties expended during their late journey to and from This account was taken from documents kept during the journey by brother . Brother said that the account exhibited was correctly taken from his accounts as he had the charge of the monies and attended to paying it out &c. The case was then submitted to the , and the counsellors severally spake in their turns. After which the and the also spake. [p. 70]
The then proceeded to give a decision, That if brother will acknowledge the following items of complaint before this & publish the same in print, that he can remain yet a member of this , otherwise he is expelled from the same, viz:— First, he is to acknowledge that he has wickedly and maliciously accused our brother J. Smith Jr. with prophesying lies in the name of the Lord, once on the line between and , and at another time after crossing the , and at another time after leaving the church in , at Florida— That he is to acknowledge that in making these charges against brother J. S. Junr. he has himself, willfully and maliciously lied. That he has maliciously told falsehoods, in saying that brother J. Smith Junr. has abused him with insulting and abusive language, and also injuring his character and standing before the brethren, while journeying to , That he further cast out insinuations concerning brother J. S. Junr’s character which was also an evil malicious design to injure brother Joseph’s standing in the church.— That he further acknowledge that he has abused the former councils which have set upon this case, and wickedly and maliciously insulted their just and righteous decisions.— That he has further tantalized this present council, in seeking to excuse himself contrary to the counselling of the counsellors, after acknowledging that it was organized by the direction of revelation. And further, that he has wilfully and maliciously lied, by saying that brother J. Smith Junr had prohibited the liberty of speech on their journey to . That he also acknowledge that he has wickedly and maliciously lied, by charging brother J. S. Junr. of being possessed of a heart as corrupt as hell. [p. 71]
The Counsellors were then called upon to give their assent to the foregoing decision, and concurred in the same.
I hereby certify that the foregoing charges or complaint are just and true, and hereby acknowledge the same, as set forth in the decisions of this , by signing my own proper name to their minutes with my own hand.
.
The council then proceeded to transact some other business, brother Joseph Smith Junr. the of the presiding. It was agreed that the church in be instructed on their particular duties &c. on sunday next, by brother Joseph. It was further decided that brother be appointed to take the lead in singing in our meetings.
The council then closed.— brother lead in prayer at fifteen minutes before 3 o clock
A.M. on Saturday the 29th 1834 ) Clerks
)
[p. 72]
N.B. The following pertains to a trial of for a misdemeanor before a held in on the 28th and 29th of August 1834, showes the order in which the Counsellors, the and the spoke and the length of time each occupied. It should have been recorded on the 71st. page previous to the decision of the .
commenced speaking about 15 minutes before 6 o clock P.M. and closed at 10 minutes past 6— .15
commenced speaking at 10 minutes past 6 o clock, closed at 15 minutes past 6 P.M.— .0.5
commenced speaking at 15 minutes past 6 and closed at 25 minutes past 6 making 10
commenced at 25 minutes past 6 and closed at 26 minutes past 6 01
commenced at 28 minutes past 6 o clock closed speaking 20 minutes before nine o, clock 2.12
commenced speaking 20 minutes before 9 and closed 15 minutes before 9 o clock 0.0.5
commenced speaking 15 minutes before 9 and closed 25 minutes before 10 o clock 0_50
spake 0.07
then commenced 18 minutes before 10 and closed at 11 o clock 1.18
[p. 73]

Footnotes

  1. 1

    TEXT: Possibly “directions”.  

  2. 2

    According to a November 1831 revelation, any decisions made by “the common court of the church,” consisting of the bishop and twelve high priests, in matters involving transgressions of the president of the high priesthood were “an end of controversy concerning him.” (Revelation, 11 Nov. 1831–B [D&C 107:83].)  

  3. 3

    This was likely the schoolhouse and printing office being constructed on a lot just west of where the House of the Lord was being constructed; the schoolhouse was also used for the council held on 11 August. (“Portion of Kirtland Township, Ohio, 12 January 1838”; Minutes, 11 Aug. 1834; see also JS, Journal, 31 Dec. 1835.)  

  4. 4

    TEXT: Possibly “Inst.”  

  5. 5

    Carter died of cholera while in Missouri with the Camp of Israel. (Kimball, “Journal and Record,” 16.)  

    Kimball, Heber C. “The Journal and Record of Heber Chase Kimball an Apostle of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints,” ca. 1842–1858. Heber C. Kimball, Papers, 1837–1866. CHL. MS 627, box 1.

  6. 6

    According to guidelines for the Kirtland high council, “Whenever any vacancy shall occur by the death, removeal from office, for transgression, or removal from the bounds of this church government of any one of the above named counsellors, it shall be filled by the nomination of the president, or presidents and sanctioned by the voice of a general Council of high priests convened for that purpose to act in the name of the Church.” (Revised Minutes, 18–19 Feb. 1834 [D&C 102:8].)  

  7. 7

    When a counselor was absent, the other counselors could “appoint other high priests whom they may consider worthy and capable to act in the place of absent counsellors.” (Revised Minutes, 18–19 Feb. 1834 [D&C 102:6–7].)  

  8. 8

    According to the Kirtland high council guidelines, “Whenever this council convenes to act upon any case; the twelve counsellors shall consider whether it is a difficult one or not; If it is not, two only of the Counsellors shall speak upon it according to the form above written; but if it is thought to be difficult, four shall be appointed, and if more difficult, six: but in no case shall more than six be appointed to speak.” (Revised Minutes, 18–19 Feb. 1834 [D&C 102:13–14].)  

  9. 9

    Jacob Bump, from Silver Creek, New York, and Asa Lyman, from Parishville, New York, both signed a statement, published in the August 1834 issue of The Evening and the Morning Star, that they were “perfectly satisfied, that whatever impressions may have gone abroad,” JS “conducted himself” honorably on the Camp of Israel expedition. (Resolutions, ca. 23 Aug. 1834; “Conference Minutes,” The Evening and the Morning Star, Aug. 1834, 182.)  

    The Evening and the Morning Star. Independence, MO, June 1832–July 1833; Kirtland, OH, Dec. 1833–Sept. 1834.

  10. 10

    The copy of these minutes in a later JS history identifies this individual as Ezekiel Rider, an elder from Chardon, Ohio, who was the subject of a bishop’s council in December 1833 for saying “hard things against Bro Whitney, the Bishop of the church.” Rider confessed his misdeed and was forgiven. (JS History, vol. A-1, 543; JS, Journal, 1 Apr. 1834; Minutes, 26 Dec. 1833.)  

    JS History / Smith, Joseph, et al. History, 1838–1856. Vols. A-1–F-1 (original), A-2–E-2 (fair copy). Historian’s Office, History of the Church, 1839–ca. 1882. CHL. CR 100 102, boxes 1–7. The history for the period after 5 Aug. 1838 was composed after the death of Joseph Smith.

  11. 11

    It is unclear who else was making charges. George A. Smith recalled that JS had a confrontation with Cyrus Smalling on the Camp of Israel expedition; perhaps Smalling also accused JS of improprieties. (George A. Smith, Autobiography, 53–54.)  

    Smith, George A. Autobiography, ca. 1860–1882. George Albert Smith, Papers, 1834–1877. CHL. MS 1322, box 1, fd. 2.

  12. 12

    It is unclear who C. Durfee is. It is possible that this was meant to say “E. Durfee,” as Edmund Durfee was a church member living in Kirtland at this time.  

  13. 13

    According to Heber C. Kimball, the Camp of Israel passed through Mansfield, Ohio, on 10 May 1834. (Kimball, “Journal and Record,” 8.)  

    Kimball, Heber C. “The Journal and Record of Heber Chase Kimball an Apostle of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints,” ca. 1842–1858. Heber C. Kimball, Papers, 1837–1866. CHL. MS 627, box 1.

  14. 14

    On 12 June 1834, JS sent Hyde and Parley P. Pratt to ask Missouri governor Daniel Dunklin to call out a militia escort for those Saints wanting to return to their Jackson County lands. Hyde and Pratt returned to the camp on 15 June. (George A. Smith, Autobiography, 31, 33.)  

    Smith, George A. Autobiography, ca. 1860–1882. George Albert Smith, Papers, 1834–1877. CHL. MS 1322, box 1, fd. 2.

  15. 15

    On 3 June 1834, while the Camp of Israel was staying at the town Louisiana, Missouri, JS’s dog either barked at or attempted to bite Sylvester Smith as he came into camp. The next morning JS reproved camp participants for “the spirit that was manifested by some of the brethren.” To show them what he meant, “he rose up and commenced speaking, by saying, ‘if any man insults me, or abuses me, I will stand in my own defence at the expense of my life; and if a dog growl at me, I will let him know that I am his master.’” According to Heber C. Kimball, Sylvester Smith entered the camp just as JS was saying this and responded, “‘If that dog bites me, I’ll kill him.’” JS retorted, “‘If you kill that dog, I’ll whip you,’ and then went on to show the brethren how wicked and unchristianlike such conduct appeared before the eyes of truth and justice.” George A. Smith said that JS also told Sylvester Smith that “he [Sylvester] was possessed of a wicked spirit and said in the name of the Lord that if he did not get rid of that spirit the day would come when a dog should bite him, and gnaw his flesh and he would not be able to resist it.” Smith then accused JS of “prophesying lies in the name of the Lord.” (“Extracts from H. C. Kimball’s Journal,” Times and Seasons, 1 Feb. 1845, 6:788–789; George A. Smith, Autobiography, 29.)  

    Times and Seasons. Commerce/Nauvoo, IL. Nov. 1839–Feb. 1846.

    Smith, George A. Autobiography, ca. 1860–1882. George Albert Smith, Papers, 1834–1877. CHL. MS 1322, box 1, fd. 2.

  16. 16

    According to George A. Smith, the incident that Luke Johnson relates here, in which Lyman Wight and Sylvester Smith disagreed with JS and Hyrum Smith’s designation of a campsite and tried to get companies to follow them to a different site, occurred on 17 June after the group “ferried the Wacondah.” According to an 1875 gazetteer of Missouri, the Wakanda was “the principal stream passing through Carroll County” and emptied into the Missouri River “five miles above the mouth of Grand River.” The Yellow Rock Prairie was located above the river. Known for its “beauty and fertility,” this prairie is probably the “twenty five mile prairie” referred to here. (George A. Smith, Autobiography, 34–35; Campbell, Campbell's Gazetteer of Missouri, 111–113.)  

    Smith, George A. Autobiography, ca. 1860–1882. George Albert Smith, Papers, 1834–1877. CHL. MS 1322, box 1, fd. 2.

    Campbell, R. A., ed. Campbell’s Gazetteer of Missouri: From Articles Contributed by Prominent Gentlemen in Each County of the State. . . . St. Louis: By the author, 1874.

  17. 17

    According to George A. Smith, Sylvester Smith had been appointed “Adjutant of the Camp” and was acting in that capacity here. (George A. Smith, Autobiography, 34.)  

    Smith, George A. Autobiography, ca. 1860–1882. George Albert Smith, Papers, 1834–1877. CHL. MS 1322, box 1, fd. 2.

  18. 18

    While camped at the Allred settlement in Missouri in June 1834, JS and the main body of the Camp of Israel were joined by a contingent from Michigan Territory led by Hyrum Smith and Lyman Wight. After the arrival of this group on 9 June, the camp was reorganized, with JS “acknowledged as Commander in-Chief” and Lyman Wight designated as general of the camp. (George A. Smith, Autobiography, 30; “Journal of the Branch of the Church of Christ in Pontiac,” 8; Kimball, “Journal and Record,” 11–12.)  

    Smith, George A. Autobiography, ca. 1860–1882. George Albert Smith, Papers, 1834–1877. CHL. MS 1322, box 1, fd. 2.

    “Journal of the Branch of the Church of Christ in Pontiac,” May–June 1834. CHL. MS 4610.

    Kimball, Heber C. “The Journal and Record of Heber Chase Kimball an Apostle of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints,” ca. 1842–1858. Heber C. Kimball, Papers, 1837–1866. CHL. MS 627, box 1.

  19. 19

    George A. Smith’s account states that, after the rebuke, Lyman Wight declared “he would stand by the Prophet for ever, and never forsake him again let the consequence be what it would.” Sylvester Smith, on the other hand, “manifested refractory feelings.” (George A. Smith, Autobiography, 35.)  

    Smith, George A. Autobiography, ca. 1860–1882. George Albert Smith, Papers, 1834–1877. CHL. MS 1322, box 1, fd. 2.

  20. 20

    This incident of JS allegedly throwing a trumpet at Sylvester Smith is not recounted in reminiscences or other accounts of the Camp of Israel. JS may have thrown or dropped the camp horn, which George A. Smith described as “a common brass french horn.” (George A. Smith, Autobiography, 24.)  

    Smith, George A. Autobiography, ca. 1860–1882. George Albert Smith, Papers, 1834–1877. CHL. MS 1322, box 1, fd. 2.

  21. 21

    George A. Smith later recalled that “Hyrum said he knew in the name of the Lord, that it was best to go onto the Prairie.” Because Hyrum was JS’s elder brother, George A. Smith continued, “Brother Joseph thought best to heed his counsel.” (George A. Smith, Autobiography, 34.)  

    Smith, George A. Autobiography, ca. 1860–1882. George Albert Smith, Papers, 1834–1877. CHL. MS 1322, box 1, fd. 2.

  22. 22

    Hyrum Smith.  

  23. 23

    Levi Hancock stated that he made the flag for the camp while they were staying at the Allred settlement in Missouri earlier in June. The flag had a drawing of an eagle, as well as “the word peace in big letters.” (Hancock, Autobiography, 143–144.)  

    Hancock, Levi Ward. Autobiography, 1803–1836. New Mormon Studies CD-ROM: A Comprehensive Resource Library, 2009. CHL.

  24. 24

    Lyman Wight.  

  25. 25

    That is, Lyman Wight refused to do anything because he believed that Hyrum Smith had told the camp to go into the prairie without an order from the company’s commander.  

  26. 26

    Lyman Wight.  

  27. 27

    Hyrum Smith.  

  28. 28

    Hyrum Smith.  

  29. 29

    Brigham Young left Kirtland before JS but joined the JS contingent of the Camp of Israel at Streetsborough, Ohio, twenty-seven miles from Kirtland, on 6 May. (Woodruff, Journal, 1 May 1834; JS History, vol. A-1, 477, addenda, 16n20.)  

    Woodruff, Wilford. Journals, 1833–1898. Wilford Woodruff, Journals and Papers, 1828–1898. CHL. MS 1352.

    JS History / Smith, Joseph, et al. History, 1838–1856. Vols. A-1–F-1 (original), A-2–E-2 (fair copy). Historian’s Office, History of the Church, 1839–ca. 1882. CHL. CR 100 102, boxes 1–7. The history for the period after 5 Aug. 1838 was composed after the death of Joseph Smith.

  30. 30

    Extant accounts of the Camp of Israel do not mention any conflict over bedding or a fight between JS and Ezra Thayer.  

  31. 31

    A detailed account of money and property JS received while on the Camp of Israel expedition does not include any information about quilts or bedding. (Account with the Camp of Israel, ca. 11–29 Aug. 1834.)  

  32. 32

    See Account with the Camp of Israel, ca. 11–29 Aug. 1834; and Account with the Church of Christ, ca. 11–29 Aug. 1834.  

  33. 33

    Williams was appointed treasurer of the expedition. According to George A. Smith, Williams’s history of the expedition and a list of all who went on it were lost. It is unclear whether his financial documents were lost as well, but they have not been located. (McBride, Reminiscence, 2; George A. Smith, Autobiography, 43.)  

    McBride, Reuben, Sr. Reminiscence, no date. CHL. MS 8197.

    Smith, George A. Autobiography, ca. 1860–1882. George Albert Smith, Papers, 1834–1877. CHL. MS 1322, box 1, fd. 2.

  34. 34

    According to the Kirtland high council constitution, “the counsellors appointed to speak before the council, are to present the case after the evidence is examined, in its true light before the Council, and every man is to speak according to equity and justice.” The six counselors who spoke were Jared Carter, Joseph Smith Sr., John Smith, Lyman Johnson, Oliver Cowdery, and Joseph Coe. (Revised Minutes, 18–19 Feb. 1834 [D&C 102:15–17].)  

  35. 35

    The constitution of the Kirtland high council also states that “in all cases the accuser and the accused shall have a privilege of speaking for themselves before the council, after the evidences are heared, and the Counsellors who are appointed to speak on the case, have finished their remarks.” (Revised Minutes, 18–19 Feb. 1834 [D&C 102:18].)  

  36. 36

    The first incident here was likely related to JS’s reprimand of Smith for not providing Parley P. Pratt with bread. The second incident occurred after Sylvester Smith and JS argued about JS’s dog. The third incident may have been related to JS’s reprimand of Smith and Lyman Wight for opposing his order to camp on the prairie. Florida, Missouri, is in Monroe County along the Salt River, near the Allred settlement where the Camp of Israel stayed from 7 to 12 June 1834. However, George A. Smith has the incident on the prairie occurring on 17 June after the camp had left the settlement. (Hancock, Autobiography, 138; “Elder Kimball’s Journal,” Times and Seasons, 15 Jan. 1845, 6:772; “Extracts from H. C. Kimball’s Journal,” Times and Seasons, 1 Feb. 1845, 6:788–789; History of Monroe and Shelby Counties, Missouri, 152; George A. Smith, Autobiography, 29–31, 34–35.)  

    Hancock, Levi Ward. Autobiography, 1803–1836. New Mormon Studies CD-ROM: A Comprehensive Resource Library, 2009. CHL.

    Times and Seasons. Commerce/Nauvoo, IL. Nov. 1839–Feb. 1846.

    History of Monroe and Shelby Counties, Missouri, Written and Compiled from the Most Authentic Official and Private Sources. . . . St. Louis: National Historical Co., 1884.

    Smith, George A. Autobiography, ca. 1860–1882. George Albert Smith, Papers, 1834–1877. CHL. MS 1322, box 1, fd. 2.

  37. 37

    When JS first organized the Kirtland high council in February 1834, he said he was doing it according to the “order of Councils in ancient days” that had been “shown to him by vision.” The constitution of the Kirtland high council also states that it was “appointed by revelation.” (Minutes, 17 Feb. 1834; Revised Minutes, 18–19 Feb. 1834 [D&C 102:2].)  

  38. 38

    As explained in the historical introduction, Smith’s name was later crossed out and under it the notation “The above was signed for fear of punishment” was written.  

  39. 39

    Since the business directly involving JS had now concluded, he assumed presiding duties from Newel K. Whitney.  

  40. 40

    “Take the lead in singing” may mean that Brigham Young sang the hymn by himself or that he led the congregation in singing. Young later recollected that in early 1835, after he and his brother Joseph “had been singing after preaching in a meeting,” JS asked them to go to his home, where the brothers sang “to him a long time.” Taking the lead could also mean “lining out” hymns, which consisted of singing one or two lines of text, which the congregation would then repeat in a type of “call-and-response” singing. Such “lining out” was common practice in many Protestant congregations. (Brigham Young, in Journal of Discourses, 7 May 1861, 9:89; Hicks, “What Hymns Early Mormons Sang and How They Sang Them,” 104–107.)  

    Journal of Discourses. 26 vols. Liverpool: F. D. Richards, 1855–1886.

    Hicks, Michael. “What Hymns Early Mormons Sang and How They Sang Them.” BYU Studies 47, no. 1 (2008): 95–118.

  41. 41

    The remainder of page 72 includes minutes from a 4 August 1834 council meeting. The following page includes a note pertaining to the 28–29 August meeting that should have been inserted earlier.