Order from Newel K. Whitney, 18 April 1834

  • Source Note
  • Historical Introduction

Document Transcript

We owe Eight Thousands dollars, which must be paid by the first of Sept. next. but if we can get 4 or 5 Thousand this month I can pay our debts here & so much of our debts in that they will wait till Sept for the balance & I also shall be able to purchase some goods this Spring for to make my assortment more compleet through the summer—
At any rate we must have 4 thousand dollars this month
The bearer hereoff Joseph Smith Jr is authorised by us to borrow from One to Eight thousand dollars & sign a note for the same in the name of which note we will hold ourselves bound to pay
18 apl. 1834
N. K. Whitney & Co [p. [1]]

Footnotes

  1. 1

    Whitney’s account book of his New York debts shows that he owed approximately $4,400 to various firms located in New York City—including Halsted, Haines & Co.; M. Wilbur & Buckley; Collins & Hannay; and C. B. Grannis & Co.—for invoices issued in October 1833. The account book indicates that $161 in interest on all these debts was due by mid-October 1834. At least some of these debts may have remained unpaid; the Halsted firm, for example, filed suit against JS in April 1838 for $2,337.35. (“New York Account Book Sept. 1834,” Newel K. Whitney, Papers, BYU; Circular, New-York Spectator, 30 Aug. 1832, [3]; Madsen, “Tabulating the Impact of Litigation on the Kirtland Economy,” 234.)  

    Whitney, Newel K. Papers, 1825–1906. BYU.

    New-York Spectator. New York City. 1804–1867.

    Madsen, Gordon A. “Tabulating the Impact of Litigation on the Kirtland Economy.” In Sustaining the Law: Joseph Smith’s Legal Encounters, edited by Gordon A. Madsen, Jeffrey N. Walker, and John W. Welch, 227–246. Provo, UT: BYU Studies, 2014.

  2. 2

    Whitney’s account book indicates that he made additional purchases in fall 1834, but there are no entries for spring 1834. (“New York Account Book Sept. 1834,” Newel K. Whitney, Papers, BYU.)  

    Whitney, Newel K. Papers, 1825–1906. BYU.